Folding and Moulding Outreach into Your Professional Pathway

Who doesn’t love a Science Café, or a Pint of Science, or any manner of extravaganza, big or small, celebrating STEM? I have been attending and participating in outreach activities my entire life. It started when as a child I would go to the ‘Science on Saturdays’ public lecture series as the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory near where I grew up. Myself and a gaggle of geeks would pile into my mom’s car and she’d drive us to hear a physicist give a lecture on any number of interesting topics. I didn’t understand every word or concept, but the idea of being in the near orbit of these science stars and sharing the experience with other neighbourhood people was like a cupcake for my brain. And as a grown-up, I took advantage of any other opportunity I could find to attend or be involved in outreach activities – during both work and play hours. It became clear to me that not only is outreach a natural instinct for me, but it is a need. So I realised that to fulfil this need, I would have to be strategic in designing my career to ensure that I could partake of or contribute to outreach in various forms.

 

Campus Talks during #LINO18: in short presentations, young scientists talked about their research to a non-scientific audience. © Julia Nimke/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Fellow nerds hungry to engage in outreach – especially science outreach – take note! It is not just ‘moi’ who can manifest outreach into their professional pathway. You, too, can incorporate outreach activities into almost every career, both in the form of providing the outreach and attending or participating in the outreach. Admittedly, some professions and organisations make this easy and seamless to do in your work time. This is especially so for organisations that include in their mission an outreach component, or have organised events or campaigns to serve the community. Of course, there are also vocations, like professorships, that require an element of ‘giving back’ as part of the promotion and tenure process.

But even for those of you in jobs that seem to be far removed from having a service component, there are still ways to weave science outreach activities into your life. In fact, as a Lindau Alumnus, you have a very easy mechanism to engage in outreach – you can share your experience at Lindau with up-and-coming scientists at your alma mater, both in person and remotely via Skype or Facebook live events. You can also volunteer to give a science talk in which you present your research, passions and goals to change the world. Additionally, perhaps you’ll volunteer to write an article for the blog of the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings. These opportunities to engage in effective science outreach are just a few of the means to communicate the importance of this amazing conference and experience, and encourage and inspire students to pursue the chance to participate in Lindau as a young scientist. And you are doing triple duty when you engage in this type of outreach, because not only are you fostering and amplifying the Lindau mission, but you are also magnifying the critical need for people of all ages and professions to support science in any way, and you are showcasing your own devotion to the cause within the community. Talk about a win-win-win!

To start thinking about incorporating science outreach into your life, consider the following points to plan an effective, customised outreach strategy for yourself.

 

Part of the ‘Mission Education’: on the Lindau Science Trail explorers can learn about discoveries that have been honoured with the Nobel Prize. © Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings/ Lisa Vincenz-Donnelly

1. Why do you want to do science outreach? There are many reasons to engage in outreach in a career. It could come from a basic place of wanting to give back or pay it forward: to help the next generation or the community understand why STEM is important. It could come from the immediate or long-term impact of knowing you made a difference. It could also be that you generally enjoy doing, planning, or being a part of outreach (for me, it’s all of those and more!). Be honest with yourself about what is driving your ambitions.

2. Who is the audience you want to reach? Are you interested in reaching grad students? Or perhaps college students? Or maybe you want to impact your community of emerging women tech entrepreneurs? With whom you want to collaborate and for whom you desire to conduct outreach matters as you plan your strategy and determine the resources you can invest.

3. On what platforms can I share my love of STEM? Lindau provides several platforms and output opportunities, be they in the form of speaking, writing, and other creative avenues. You can contact the Lindau Alumni Network to ask how you can be involved and suggest ways to partner- we would love to hear from you! But there are other ways to share your passion for STEM in your community. Consider a Science Café or Pint of Science, both are international programmes. Contact your local university and ask if you can volunteer to give a colloquium.

4. How about mentoring? Mentoring is a fabulous way to engage in outreach and to truly pass on your devotion to a subject, field, and profession to those early in their career. Mentoring can be both formal, in which you participate in an established programme, or informal, where you take on a protégé to enable their success. As you advance in your career, you will find that mentoring as an activity may come very naturally, in that there will be peers and people earlier than you in the field around you, to whom you very organically provide advice while assisting them in removing barriers for their professional triumph. Don’t underestimate the value of mentoring even one person.

Keep in mind that outreach can be added and mixed into your career at any time in the career spectrum, in various forms and fashions. But one particular method and output of outreach is to support the Lindau Alumni Network and our additional efforts. This could be as simple as following us on and retweeting on social media. It could also include you volunteering to give a talk to your local university about what it was like to be a Lindau participant.

No matter how and when and where you decide to engage in outreach, make sure you enjoy yourself! And never lose sight of the fact that as a STEM-educated professional (no matter what career you have chosen), there is always opportunity to ignite the public’s excitement for science and engineering. When we communicate our own love of STEM and the role STEM plays in society, we contribute to a better understanding and appreciation of science and research in society. And this serves everyone. It is a privilege and an honour to serve the public in any form, and I am glad it is something you are considering in your long-term professional strategy!

‘Nobel Heroes’: New Photographs of the 2018 Laureates

Since 2000, photo artist Peter Badge has been portraying all living Nobel Laureates as part of a joined project with the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings. Today, just a few weeks after the 2018 Nobel Prize Award Ceremony in Stockholm, we are pleased to present the new photographs of the recent laureates.

The long-running project ‘Nobel Laureates in Portrait’ has taken photographer Peter Badge around the globe, creating an impressive collection of over 400 photographs of Nobel Laureates. Badge’s photos do not show the laureates primarily in their role as excellent scientists; what is artistically expressed by each individual black-and-white photograph is rather the image of a person in his or her very individual personality – this is what makes Badge’s photographs so unique.

James P. Allison and Tasuku Honjo, 2018 Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine, © Peter Badge/typos 1 in coop. with Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Badge’s photographs have wandered around the world in recent years to be shown in various exhibitions. Most recently, in spring 2018, there was an exhibition at the Los Alamos History Museum, USA. In 2017, the world renowned German publisher Steidl produced an illustrated book with the portrait photographs of the laureates under the title ‘Nobel Heroes’.

Immediately after the names of this year’s Nobel Laureates had been announced in the first week of October, Peter Badge set off again to get the laureates of the year 2018 in front of the camera. Today, we are pleased to present these new photographs.

Arthur Ashkin, Donna Strickland and Gérard Mourou, 2018 Nobel Laureates in Physics, © Peter Badge/typos 1 in coop. with Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Frances H. Arnold, Gregory P. Winter and George P. Smith, 2018 Nobel Laureates in Chemistry, © Peter Badge/typos 1 in coop. with Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

The encounters with the award-winning scientists are far more than sober photo sessions; often enough, these encounters give unforgettable insights into the unique life story of a human. At the age of 96, Arthur Ashkin, laureate of the Nobel Prize in Physics, is the oldest person in the long history of the Nobel Prize who has ever been awarded with the prize. When Peter Badge and Marc Pachter, director emeritus of the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, visited Ashkin in his home in New Jersey, USA, the laureate has expressed great enthusiasm for the ideas of the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings and their goal of promoting intergenerational exchange between Nobel Laureates and young scientists from all over the world:

“The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings make a great contribution by promoting dialogue between young scientists and Nobel Laureates. In my entire scientific career, beginning in the 1940s, mentorship was a critical element. I received guidance and inspiration from many scientists including Nobel Laureates like Hans Bethe. Now, at 96, as the oldest individual to be honoured with the Nobel Prize in its long history, I salute the Lindau tradition of connecting the generations and wish the meeting all the best for the future.”

Denis Mukwege and Nadia Murad, 2018 Nobel Laureates in Peace, © Peter Badge/typos 1 in coop. with Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

William D. Nordhaus and Paul M. Romer, 2018 Laureates in Economic Sciences, © Peter Badge/typos 1 in coop. with Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings thank the Klaus Tschira Stiftung for their continuous project support. We are looking forward to the future collaboration and further impressive photo portraits of Nobel Laureates.

#LINO18 Daily Recap – Friday, 29 June 2018

After a week filled with impassionate lectures, insightful discussions and an abundance of scientific exchange we have come to the end of our  68th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting – before we bid you farewell, take one more look at our highlights from Friday.

 

Picture of the day:

Farewell

Young scientist Nataly Naser Al Deen gave a heartfelt farewell speech to all #LINO18 participants.

Photo/Credit: Gero von der Stein/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

For even more pictures from the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings, past and present, take a look at our Flickr account.

 

Blog post of the day: 

Young scientists attending a Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting frequently ask the laureates for career advice. In her latest blog post Tracing the Beginnings of a Scientific Career, Melissae Fellet describes  J. Michael Bishop’s and Harold Varmus’ experiences on career planning.  

Harold Varmus J. and Michael Bishop during the #LINO18 Agora Talk. Photo/Credit: Julia Nimke/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

Do take a look at more exciting blog posts.

 

Tweets of the day:

https://twitter.com/MohamedBrolosy/status/1012684984447045632?s=09

https://twitter.com/Kiaraso/status/1012633901024661504?s=19

https://twitter.com/embl/status/1012683990795456512?s=19

Last but not least, follow us on Twitter @lindaunobel and Instagram @lindaunobel and keep an eye out for #LINO18

 

Video of the day:

A glimpse of the final day of #LINO18 filled with inspiring encounters, fruitful discussions and last but not least a great party.

 

Obviously, this is not the only video of #LINO18! You are more than welcome to browse through our mediatheque or our YouTube channel for more!

 

This was our last Daily Recap. We hope you enjoyed this week as much as we did and felt the Lindau Spirit!

Goodbye Lindau Alumni! Let’s stay connected!

#LINO18 Daily Recap – Thursday, 28 June 2018

Thursday was the last day at the Inselhalle in Lindau but not the last day of the meeting. Friday is going to take our participants to Mainau Island, so while they are enjoying their last day on this picturesque island, let’s take a look at what happened yesterday. Here are our highlights from Thursday:

Picture of the day:

Lecture by Ada Yonath

Nobel Laureate Ada Yonath giving a fascinating lecture on ‘Next Generation Species Specific Eco Friendly Antibiotics and Thoughts about Origin of Life’.

 

Picture/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting

For even more pictures from the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings, past and present, take a look at our Flickr account.

 

Blog post of the day:

What will the future of scientific publishing look like? In her latest post, blogger Judith Reichel reflects on the heated debate during the #LINO18 panel discussion ‘Publish or Perish’.

#LINO18 panel discussion ‘Publish or Perish’. Photo/Credit: Patrick Kunkel/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Do take a look at more exciting blog posts.

 

Tweets of the day:

https://twitter.com/martina_kapitza/status/1012440530125508608

Last but not least, follow us on Twitter @lindaunobel and Instagram @lindaunobel and keep an eye out for #LINO18

 

Video of the day:

Nobel Laureate Martin Chalfie talks about his experiences in Lindau and shares that the best part of the meetings are the interactions with young scientists.

 

Obviously, this is not the only video from yesterday and today! You are more than welcome to browse through our mediatheque or our YouTube channel for more!

 

Tomorrow you will receive our last daily recap of the 68th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting. Then it will be over with the  highlights in a blink of an eye. The daily recaps feature blog posts, photos and videos from the mediatheque.

#LINO18 Daily Recap – Wednesday, 27 June 2018

With Wednesday ending, we are striding towards the last two days of the 68th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting – but that most certainly does not mean that the next days will be any less exciting than the previous ones. Talking about exciting days, let’s go take a look at some of yesterday’s highlights!

 

Video of the day:

The panel discussion ‘Publish or Perish’ with Nobel Laureates Randy Schekman and Harold Varmus was a heated debate on the role of high-impact scientific journals, transparency in the publication process and the responsibilities of publishers and scholars. 

 

 

Obviously, this is not the only video of #LINO18! You are more than welcome to browse through our mediatheque or our YouTube channel for more!

 

Picture of the day:

Science Breakfast

Nobel Laureate Tim Hunt enjoying a light-hearted conversation with young scientists during the Science Breakfast of #LINO18

Photo/Credit : Patrick Kunkel/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

For even more pictures from the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings, past and present, take a look at our Flickr account.

 

Blog post of the day:

We can’t wait for the Bavarian Evening taking place tonight! On our blog, Alaina Levine proposes some Dos and Don’ts  for the penultimate #LINO18 party, and she also lifts a little surprise of the night…

Photo/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

Do take a look at more exciting blog posts.

 

Tweets of the day:

https://twitter.com/JunkoShimazu3/status/1012024739236368384

 

Last but not least, follow us on Twitter @lindaunobel and Instagram @lindaunobel and keep an eye out for #LINO18

 

Over the course of the next two days, we will keep you updated on the 68th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting with our daily recaps. The idea behind it is to bring to you the day’s highlights in a blink of an eye. The daily recaps will feature blog posts, photos and videos from the mediatheque.

#LiNO18 Daily Recap – Tuesday, 26 June 2018

We are already three days into this year’s Lindau Meeting and there are so many interesting things happening. We have collected a huge amount of exhilarating pictures, exceptional lectures and thought-provoking blog contributions. So as you can imagine there is so much more you should definitely check out on our mediatheque. For now enjoy some of yesterday’s highlights below!

 

Picture of the day:

Poster Session

Mohammed El-Brolosy explaining his research to other young scientists and Nobel Laureate Bruce Beutler 

Photo/Credit: Julia Nimke/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

For even more pictures from the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings, past and present, take a look at our Flickr account.

 

Blog post of the day:

In her latest blog post, science journalist Alaina Levine describes the challenges of improving health care in developing nations and presents some exciting initiatives of #LINO18 young scientists Svenja Kohler from Germany, Nataly Naser Al Deen from Lebanon and Jeerapond Leelawattanachai from Thailand. 

 

Do take a look at more exciting blog posts.

 

Tweets of the day:

Last but not least, follow us on Twitter @lindaunobel and Instagram @lindaunobel and keep an eye out for #LINO18

 

 

Video of the day:

Young scientist Arunima Roy from the University of Würzburg comments on the psychology of the post-factual problem, describing her research on ADHD and how it can help to understand people’s inability to pay attention.

 

 

Obviously, this is not the only video from yesterday and today! You are more than welcome to browse through our mediatheque or our YouTube channel for more!

 

Over the course of the next three days, we will keep you updated on the 68th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting with our daily recaps. The idea behind it is to bring to you the day’s highlights in a blink of an eye. The daily recaps will feature blog posts, photos and videos from the mediatheque.

 

#LiNO18 Daily Recap – Monday, 25 June 2018

Yesterday, the scientific programme of the 68th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting commenced. It was an inspiring day full of scientific exchange – this short recap can only give you a glimpse of everything that happened. You should definitely have a look at our mediatheque to see all the fascinating lectures!

 

Picture of the day:

Science Walk

Nobel Laureate Michael Levitt and young scientists enjoying a relaxing walk by the lake 

Picture/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

For even more pictures from the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings, past and present, take a look at our Flickr account.

 

Blog post of the day:

Never before have we had so many tools at our disposal to communicate and disseminate facts. And yet, the current general political and societal climate feels very anti-science and anti-fact. In her latest blog post, science writer Judith Reichel discusses whether science communication can bridge the gap and how Nobel Laureate Peter Doherty approaches the issue. “First and foremost, as science communicators, we have to base our stories and articles on facts and hard evidence,” he said during yesterday’s Agora Talk.

 

Nobel Laureate Peter Doherty and science journalist Zulfikar Abbany during the Agora Talk at #LINO18. Photo/Credit: Patrick Kunkel/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

Do take a look at more exciting blog posts.

 

Tweets of the day:

Last but not least, follow us on Twitter @lindaunobel and Instagram @lindaunobel and keep an eye out for #LINO18

 

Video of the day:

To kick off the scientific programme, freshly minted Nobel Laureate in Physiology and Medicine Michael Rosbash gave an engaging first lecture on the inner clock.

 

 

Obviously, this is not the only video from yesterday and today! You are more than welcome to browse through our mediatheque for more.

 

Over the course of the next six days, we will keep you updated on the 68th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting with our daily recaps. The idea behind it is to bring to you the day’s highlights in a blink of an eye. The daily recaps will feature blog posts, photos and videos from the mediatheque.

#LiNO18 Daily Recap – Sunday, 24 June 2018

Do good science for the good of humanity.

Nobel Laureate Elizabeth Blackburn

 

 

Yesterday, the 68th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting started in grand fashion with the festive opening ceremony featuring the warm and heartfelt welcome address by Countess Bettina Bernadotte and a very impassionate keynote address by Elizabeth Blackburn on the important role of science in today’s society and politics.

 

Picture of the day:

Inselhalle

We are happy to welcome 600 young scientists and 39 Nobel Laureates to our new and modernised meeting venue Inselhalle.

Photo/Credit: Julia Nimke/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting

 

For even more pictures from the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings, past and present, take a look at our Flickr account.

 

Blog post of the day:

Spotlight on Women in Research at #LINO18


Some of the talented female young scientists of #LINO18 have answered questions about their career path, their passion for science, their struggles and successes and give advice to other women in research.

Do take a look at more exciting blog posts.

 

Tweets of the day:

 

Last but not least, follow us on Twitter @lindaunobel and Instagram @lindaunobel and keep an eye out for #LINO18

 

Video of the day:

“We can all agree that to solve humanity’s great challenges, we need all of humanity involved.”

Nobel Laureate Elizabeth Blackburn opened the Lindau Meeting with a keynote speech from the perspective of a leading scientist. In remarks directed towards those shaping research policy, she pleaded for a stronger integration of science in political decisions to resist the ‘post-truth age’.

Obviously, this is not the only video from yesterday and today! You are more than welcome to browse through our mediatheque for more.

Over the course of the next six days, we will keep you updated on the 68th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting with our daily recaps. The idea behind it is to bring to you the day’s highlights in a blink of an eye. The daily recaps will feature blog posts, photos and videos from the mediatheque.

Welcome to the Lindau Alumni Network

Last year, in time for the 67. Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, we launched the Lindau Alumni Network. The Lindau Alumni Network is the exclusive online community for alumni of the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings. A digital space to keep the “Lindau Spirit” alive. Now, after a year of interactions and more than 1000 active users, we would like to announce the launch of the updated and redesigned Lindau Alumni Network!

Photo/Credit: Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Login for Lindau Alumni and 2018 Young Scientists

Lindau Alumni who already had access to the Lindau Alumni Network, including all alumni of the 2013–2017 meetings, have a profile in the new community. They will be invited by email to activate their profile.  In order to foster online interaction prior to this year’s meeting, access to the Lindau Alumni Network is already open for #LINO18 participants. They, too, can login by activating their profile by clicking on the link in their invitation email. Other Lindau Alumni can now easily request an invitation to join the community on the public login page.

Features of the Lindau Alumni Network

The Lindau Alumni  Network still has all the core features, some were considerably expanded. Here are some of the improved features that wait for you in the Lindau Alumni Network:

  • Search the alumni directory for fellow scientists: A world map gives you a quick overview of Lindau Alumni near you. Use search operators including name, home institution, home country, alma mater, work group, year of the attended meeting and more. As the Lindau Alumni Network grows, so will the search directory.
  • Find alumni events: The Lindau Alumni Network is the place to find announcements and invitations for local and global Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings alumni events. The next event Lindau Alumni can register for is our first Lindau Alumni Workshop with Alaina Levine on 10 July 2018 in Toulouse, France. In the new Lindau Alumni Network, it is easier for Lindau Alumni to create and promote their own events! The trips feature lets alumni easily inform others about their upcoming travel, making informal meet ups easier to organize.  
  • Expanded personal profile: A personal profile page is created for every alumnus or alumna based on their submitted data from the application process. Every Lindau Alumni Network user has control over the information that is shared, and can add details on, e.g., research interests or personal background. As a new feature, users can now add information to their profile by importing their LinkedIn or Xing profile.
  • Exchange ideas: The Lindau Alumni Network offers a number of ways to exchange ideas, plans and anecdotes with others. The “Activity” stream offers a timeline similar to that of popular social networks, with options to easily share interesting links, fascinating videos and evocative images. A news section will include exclusive blog articles and interviews with Lindau Alumni. The trips feature lets alumni easily inform others about their upcoming travel, making informal meet ups easier to organize.    
  • Organise with other alumni: Users can create or join groups and this way organise with fellow alumni around shared interests and experiences. Groups administered by the alumni and communications team are a unique way to stay up-to-date with all things revolving around the Lindau Meetings.   
  • Peruse the job and calls board: The Lindau Alumni Network includes a job board that will be updated with select, high quality job offers and calls for papers and nominations to conference. The job board offers a space to find qualified, skilled employees and partners who are already part of a select group: The Lindau Alumni.
Picture/Credit: Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Picture/Credit: Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Users can find more information on how to use these features within the Lindau Alumni Network. For any questions or suggestions regarding the Lindau Alumni Network and other alumni activities, please contact Christoph Schumacher, the Alumni and Community Manager.

 

>>Log-in to the Lindau Alumni Network Here

 

#LiNo17 Daily Recap – Sunday, 25 June 2017

“I close my remarks by asking the young students gather this week at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting to consider joining the effort to combat climate change.” – Steven Chu

Yesterday, the 67th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting started in grand fashion with the festive opening ceremony featuring the warm and heartfelt welcome address by Countess Bettina Bernadotte and a very poignant and moving keynote by Steven Chu. The Nobel Laureate himself was, unfortunately, unable to attend, but his fellow laureate William E. Moerner luckily stepped in to deliver the powerful speech on “Science as an Insurance Policy to the Risks of Climate Change”.

 

Video of the day:

“A changing climate does not respect national boundaries.”
First highlight is Steven Chu’s keynote, read by William Moerner. Chu addressed the highly topical issue of climate change and reminded all of us how important it is to treat the earth well.

Obviously, this is not the only video from yesterday and today! You are more than welcome to browse through our mediatheque for more.

 

Picture of the day:

Standing Ovations
William Moerner’s presentation of Steven Chu’s keynote was one of the most moving moments.

67th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, 25.06.2017, Lindau, Germany

67th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, 25.06.2017, Lindau, Germany

For even more pictures from the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings, past and present, take a look at our Flickr account.

 

Blog post of the day:

“A Stellar Meeting Where the Stars Shine Bright, the Science Is Chill, and the Networking Is Chem-Tastic.”
Another highlight is the blog post from science writer Alaina G. Levine. She is back in Lindau for #LiNo17 and gives a preview of the panel discussion on science careers that she will chair on Thursday (replacing Karan Khemka).

Do take a look at more exciting blog posts.

 

Tweets of the day:

 

 

Last but not least, follow us on Twitter @lindaunobel and Instagram @lindaunobel and keep an eye out for #LiNo17

 

Over the course of the next six days, we will keep you updated on the 67th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting with our daily recaps. The idea behind it is to bring to you the day’s highlights in a blink of an eye. The daily recaps will feature blog posts, photos and videos from the mediatheque.