Final Preparations: Lindau Calling! (#LiNoEcon)

In just a few days, Lindau’s Stadttheater (= city theatre) will open its doors to a week full of inspirational exchange and education. We, the organising team of the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings, are very much looking forward to having this incredible number of bright minds here on our small island.

67th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, 25.06.2017, Lindau, Germany

The 6th Lindau Meeting on Economic Sciences will take place at Lindau’s city theatre. Photo/Credit: Julia Nimke/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

By now, you’ve probably gone through the numerous phases of preparation, perhaps even packing. So let us give you some last minute guidance and lists for repacking your gear.

 

The Programme

Perhaps you’ve already gotten around to checking this year’s meeting programme. If not, don’t worry – here’s the link to the full programme booklet.

22.08.2014 Lindau, Germany,  5th Lindau Meeting on Economic Sciences  5. Lindauer Tagung der Wirtschaftswissenschaften Picture/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Laureate Peter A. Diamond at #LiNoEcon 2014. Photo/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

Getting Here

We do not organise any shuttle buses to Lindau; thus, you will have to organise your trip to Lindau yourself.

Most likely, you’ll be arriving in Lindau by train. All airports you might be flying into offer connections to “Lindau Hbf” (the train station to head to) via train. You can either buy a ticket at the train stations or via www.bahn.com. You have arrived in Lindau as soon as you see water to your left, to your right and in front of you. Welcome to Lake Constance!

 

Registration

In order to take advantage of everything Lindau has to offer, you need to register with us and get your conference materials. Upon registration, you will receive your name badge, which indicates to our staff which events you will attend, your personal agenda, the final programme and more.

Registration of young economists will take place in the city theater (Stadttheater) and will open on Tuesday, 22 August from 10.00 hrs until 20.00 hrs and Wednesday, 23 August from 7.30 hrs until 18.00 hrs. Please note that you will have to show a valid ID at the registration desk.

 

Everything Else You Need to Know

The opening ceremony starts on Wednesday at 9.00 hrs, and the Stadttheater will open its doors at 8.00 hrs. Seats have to be taken by 8.45 hrs. For security reasons, it is not allowed to bring any large bags. For your convenience, there will be space to store your luggage securely just outside the Stadttheater at the Turnhalle (the primary school gym opposite the back entrance of the theatre). You will need to present your name badge and a valid ID-card in order to get access.

For a Google Map with all the important places in Lindau, please click here (or check the meeting app):

 

 

What to Bring & What to Wear

There is no dress code for the regular scientific sessions. For invitational dinners, you may want to bring something more festive (suits, cocktail dresses). As the lake is great for swimming, you may want to bring swim wear. Some of the local swimming pools even offer free entrance for the participants of the Lindau Meeting. Sunscreen and mosquito repellents are a good idea as well. 

Make sure to bring comfortable shoes that are suitable for cobblestone roads and various weather conditions. A hairdryer may be useful as well as a voltage converter (220 volts) or adapter as German socket-outlets vary from those abroad.

Over the last years, one of the events has become particularly popular among all participants: the “Bavarian Evening” supported by the Free State of Bavaria. For this, it is a great idea to wear a traditional festive costume from your home country. Those of you who own a traditional Bavarian costume (Dirndl dress or Lederhosen) are more than welcome to wear that instead.

 

At the Bavarian evening, everyone is invited to wear the traditional outfit of their home country. Photo/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

At the Bavarian evening, everyone is invited to wear the traditional outfit of their home country. Photo/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

Morning Workouts

For those of you participating in the morning workouts: please bring comfortable sportswear, a towel and sturdy sneakers. Water bottles will be provided upon registration.

 

Internet & Phones

The meeting venue is equipped with wireless LAN (WiFi). Special log-in credentials will not be required – just follow the instructions.

It’s always helpful to bring along your mobile phone so that we will be able to contact you easily. To use a mobile phone in a German network, it needs to support the GSM standard (used all over Europe). The German country code is +49.

 

Lindau, Germany, 22.08.2014. 5th Lindau Meeting on Economic Sciences/5. Lindauer Tagung der Wirtschaftswissenschaften. Science Breakfast UBS , Roger Myerson (2.v.l.) Picture/Credit: Rolf Schultes/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Laureate Roger B. Myerson at the 5th Lindau Meeting on Economic Sciences. Photo/Credit: Rolf Schultes/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

Emergencies

In case of an emergency at the main meeting venue, please contact the staff. Please note that our staff is not authorised to hand out any medication. A paramedic team is present at the meeting venue and can help with all health-related issues. If you have an emergency at a different location, please either contact any of the staff if present, or call 112, the official emergency number that will work in all of the EU countries and in Switzerland. During the meeting, you will be covered by a health insurance policy provided by the organisers.

 

The Meeting App

There will be a conference app available at the 6th Lindau Meeting on Economic Sciences. All the information from this post can also be found there (…and more). For an in-depth explanation on how to get started with the app, please refer to my colleague Christoph’s guide.

 

Last but Not Least

If you want to get a taste of the “Lindau spirit” prior to the meeting, you are invited to take a look at our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter (@lindaunobel) and Instagram (@lindaunobel). Throughout the week of the meeting, we will try to post as much interesting content as possible via #LiNoEcon, this year’s official hashtag. Do join the conversation – we’d be happy!

My colleagues and I will be happy to assist you at the Young Scientist Help Desk, should you have any questions. It is going to be a great week, so let’s make the most of it!

And finally, if you haven’t seen them yet, take a look at our new bags, which will soon be yours ;-)

 

Lindau Calling #LiNoEcon

Nadine, Karen and Nesrin – always there to help you out during your time in Lindau! Photo/Credit: Lisa Vincenz-Donnelly/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings 

 

After Nerd Heaven: Once a Lindau Attendee, Always a Lindau Alum

It has been a few weeks since the 67th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in Chemistry and while you probably have gotten back in the swing of things at work and university, you probably are still walking around with a huge grin on your face. I know I am. I can’t stop smiling when I think about my experience at Lindau. The lectures! The laughter! The lifetime connections I forged! (And don’t forget about the food! Oh, the glorious Bavarian and Mexican food!) It was an unforgettable – and unreproducible – experience.

Now your colleagues are probably wondering why you keep showing off your pearly whites – what are you so happy about? They might not get it, but we do. I attended as a journalist, blogger and the chair of the Science Careers panel, and I get it and I get you. You experienced something amazing – you experienced Nerd Heaven. You were in a place that celebrates success and curiosity and insight and nature and encourages you to be scientific pioneers, exploring the frontiers of knowledge and our universe. You participated in a once-in-a-lifetime intersection of intelligence and impact. Of course you are still fondly thinking of it!

 

Young scientists during the 67th Lindau Meeting, Picture/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Picture/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

Now while your Lindau experience may have seemed like it only lasted one week, let me assure you that that is incorrect. The Lindau Meeting is simply the first step in a continuum of Lindau experiences you are about to enjoy. And you won’t be alone in this journey, because as a participant in the meeting, you now share the singular experience that binds you with every other Lindau attendee. You are a Lindau Alumnus or Alumna, and this is something special.

Alumni are extremely important to organisations and Lindau is no different. The success of future Lindau Meetings is dependent upon your success. As scientists, you are society’s gatekeepers, providing us access to information and ideas that move us forward. As Lindau Alumni, you matter, because you make science happen. And therefore you make Lindau happen.

So as new alumni, here are a few ideas to solidify and grow the networking momentum that you experienced at Lindau as you move beyond the place of Lindau and towards the concept of Lindau:

  • Review the Science Careers panel: you are sure to get additional insight into how and why to invest in your career in science, how you can make an impact, how you can pursue your career, what careers are accessible to you (hint: it’s limited only by your imagination!), and how to go about career planning. The panel provided invaluable advice and if you watch it again with fresh eyes, you may catch something you didn’t before. I know I did!

  • Keep your contact information updated: the Lindau folks will be contacting you. They want to keep you involved and engaged in Lindau and with each other. They are invested in your success in the future. So make sure you keep them apprised when you change jobs, institutions, and fields, and when you have triumphs. Key point – when you win the Nobel Prize, make sure you call them immediately after you hear from Sweden! But seriously, stay in touch, and take note that even if at some point you decide to pursue a non-traditional profession or arena, or decide to leave science (seemingly) altogether (fancy a career in cupcakes, do you?), you should still stay in touch. You are still an Alum. You still are still part of the Lindau ecosystem and you are still part of the Lindau family.
  • Take advantage of Lindau Alumni resources: over the next few months and years, you will be hearing about many projects and programmes that Lindau is planning to bolster its alumni network and create opportunities for you to succeed. They will be holding in-person events around the world and webinars related to career development, professional advancement, and job and career planning. They will be enhancing social media networking, so join them and contribute to the conversation. Be sure to join the Lindau Alumni Network. The Council for the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings aims to grow the alumni network and continuously provide value to Lindau Alumni to meet your professional needs and objectives. So you can also let them know how they can help you!
  • Go through the calling (aka business) cards that you collected at the conference. Reach out to those people and let them know how nice it was to meet them at the Lindau Meeting. Connect with them on career networks, and then stay connected with them. Keep them apprised of your career progression. When you know that you are attending Conference X, email them and ask them if they will be too and see if you can schedule a dinner or a coffee appointment. Stay in touch. These are your peers and they are walking similar roads as you. Don’t let the networking you did at Lindau be for nothing. Cultivate those relationships.

 

Picture/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Picture/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

  • Follow up with the laureates! You want to build a win-win partnership with the people in your networks, and the laureates are no different. So keep them apprised of your triumphs and trials, seek their advice, and help them to help you. And of course, look for ways you can help them, too! For ideas on how young scientists can provide value to leaders in your field, check out my article, Networking with Dr. God, in Science/ScienceCareers, featuring Nobel Laureate and Lindau participant, William Phillips.
  • Promote your Lindau experiences. Volunteer to give a presentation at you institution about the Lindau Meeting and experience, write an article for your local or university or association publication, offer to meet with colleagues who might have an interest in attending. Be a champion for Lindau so others can learn of its relevance and participate in it and invest in it (and become alumni too!).

 The most important thing is to remember you are part of a global team of individuals who have the privilege to be Lindau Alumni, and with great privilege comes great responsibility. Yes, there are many benefits you will receive as an active Lindau Alum – career advice and resources, ideas and inspiration, networking, and of course, greater potential impact of your science. But there is also something of value you can provide the scientific community, and that is to take the information, knowledge and principles that you gained at Lindau and disseminate them. Educate. Inspire. Connect. Lindau is more than a place, it is a platform and you must ensure that the ideas shared here are acted upon. As Lindau Alumni, you have that power.

Stay tuned for Lindau Alumni news, and again, welcome to the family! Your adventure is just beginning, and you have thousands of compatriots (representing 80+ countries) aligned with you to advance science, advance society, and advance humankind. I can’t wait to see what you and your Alumni brethren will do.

 

Young scientists during the 67th Lindau Meeting, Picture/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Picture/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

A Long Road to Becoming a Chemist

The path to my professional career as a chemist was not easy but constructive and challenging in some ways. I grew up in a small, quiet and traditional town in the state of Mexico Texcoco. Both of my parents had to overcome severe economic difficulties to pursue their own career in biology. Thankfully, I was blessed with their pledge to provide me a good education.

I attended a private school to learn English and because the academic programme was more challenging. During my basic education, I participated in several science and academic contests and I enjoyed the school profoundly. My generation was the first that stayed at home, there were not more chances to play in the streets or the neighbourhood, because of the numerous cars in the streets and the worsening of security. Then, in the middle school, I attended a math workshop where I learned tricks to do arithmetic operations in a flash and to solve math puzzles. With that training, I was selected to participate in Math Counts and the Pierre Fermat contest. Later, I enrolled in the EPT-UAEM public high school and was benefitted with a scholarship. During my last year there, I was invited to train for the regional Chemistry Olympiads. I was selected to continue to the state and furthermore the national contest.  That stage was meaningful for my further decision to study chemistry since I was selected to attend Mexico’s National Olympiad of Chemistry. This privilege implied a strong commitment by means of travelling two hours to the school of Chemistry of UAEM-Mexico to be trained for the competition, and then two hours more for the way back. I travelled with my mother after the school in an old van provided by the principal two or three days a week during some months. We arrived at home almost at midnight, exhausted but enthusiastic about my training and the hopeful support within my family. I valued that experience greatly because other peers and I received fascinating lessons with devoted teachers and scientists.

 

Photo: Courtesy of Ana Torres

Ana Torres in front of the Rudder Fountain on the Texas A&M University campus, Photo: Courtesy of Ana Torres

 

After the enriching experience of attending the national contest and motivated by my teachers I decided to study chemistry in the School of Chemistry of the National Autonomous University of Mexico. So therefore, I spent four hours on a round-trip each day to Mexico City to pursue my bachelor degree. Sometimes I travelled by car with my father before dawn, but other days I had tiring trips in the overcrowded subway and the bus, which arrived in the middle of nowhere, where my parents picked me up. Fortunately, quantum chemistry captivated me and I joined a theoretical research workgroup after I had my first course in that subject area.

One year later, I got my bachelor degree with honours and continued my postgraduate studies in chemistry supported by a grant of the National Council of Science and Technology. Usually, there are very few students willing to pursue a career in Theoretical Chemistry in my program. It is worth mentioning that while I studied, my advisor and other theorists designed the Quantum and Computational Chemistry post-graduate courses – indeed some of the lectures were given for the very first time. Furthermore, at that time I started my own family and I had to organise my time efficiently to get a functional balance between motherhood, research and teaching. Therefore, through family shared efforts, hard-work and passion for science I graduated with honours, gaining the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in chemistry, whereas my son developed a love for math.

 

Ana Torres with her parents, Photo: Courtesy of Ana Toores

Ana Torres with her parents, Socorro Hernandez and Pablo Torres, at the National Autonomus Unviersity of Mexico, Photo: Courtesy of Ana Torres

 

I became a teacher and mentor for undergraduate students just after I got my Master’s degree. Then, for the Ph.D., I moved to the Materials Research Institute where Prof. Serguei Fomine became my advisor. From him I learned a strong discipline of work and a structured way to analyse the chemical problems. This contributed positively since I graduated in less time than my postgraduate program demarked. After I graduated, I was accepted for a postdoctoral position within the group of Prof. Perla Balbuena in Texas A&M University. Thus, I dealt with almost six months of paperwork to get a scholarship and arrange the immigration documentation for my son, my husband and for me. I arrived in the US one month later than the start date of the programme given the migratory issues. At present, I am grateful for the support and academic guidance of Prof. Balbuena and committed to work hard on my research project. My family and I are partaking this opportunity to grow in academic and personal areas and I shall respond to their great effort. Science has opened me the doors to travel to countries abroad and to build collaborations and friendships. Currently, I am member of the Graduate Women in Science organisation, the Toastmasters club as well as the group of Bible studies for women and I enjoy sharing Spanish classes.

 

Lindau Alumni 2017 Ana Torres and Octavio Saucedo, Nobel Laureate Mario Molina, former President of the Mexican Academy of Sciences Jose Franco and Director of International Cooperation CONACYT, Arturo Borja (from left to right) after a discussion on Public Policy at the 67th Lindau Meeting, Photo: Courtesy of Ana Torres

Lindau Alumni 2017 Ana Torres and Octavio Saucedo, Nobel Laureate Mario Molina, Jose Franco, former President of the Mexican Academy of Sciences, and Arturo Borja, Director of International Cooperation CONACYT, (from left to right) after a discussion on Public Policy at the 67th Lindau Meeting, Photo: Courtesy of Ana Torres

 

The main goal of my current research project is to perform a theoretical study of the interfacial phenomena relevant for the development of new generation rechargeable batteries. Likewise, I will address the confinement effect exerted by molecular sieves, solvents, nano-structured materials or an inert gas matrix over the chemical reactions, which are important for chemical catalysis. It is expected that the outcome of this project would support experimental research that has been developed for both the description and design of battery materials and catalytic systems. Nowadays, it is important to assist the novel frontier materials design (with enhanced features) using theoretical methods and computational calculations before being synthetised in the laboratory. This could be very helpful to optimise resources and facilitate the materials implementation for the manufacturing process of technological devices.

Lessons Learned at the Lindau Meeting

My main goal for the Lindau Meeting was not to discuss specific scientific matters (although I must confess that I did), but it was to discuss general problematic issues in science and in society. The meeting exceeded all of my expectations. The Nobel Laureates gave amazing lectures, which were  followed by insightful and enriching discussions. My take away messages were: work hard and pursue your goals, keep your eyes wide open for unexpected results, be flexible and do not fear the unknown, always question yourself and your observations.

 

Matías Acosta with other young scientists and Nobel Laureate George Smoot during the 67th Lindau Meeting. Picture/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Matías Acosta with young scientist Jeffrey Poon and Nobel Laureate George Smoot during the 67th Lindau Meeting. Picture/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

The first lesson learned: science is not a separate entity from society. We, young scientists, should communicate science to broad audiences. As pointed out by chemist Michael Lerch, we should remember our role within society and clarify the expectations of our work. This is especially true if our project is financed by public funding. We should not forget though that there are scientific reporters quite eager to communicate our work. So we have not one but two approaches to improving the disconnection between science and the public.

Young scientists are facing a constantly growing pressure of having to publish. Publishing for the sake of publishing rather than a mean to transmit knowledge has become a reality in many research groups. We are not in a strong position to combat this issue. However, there are some aspects that we should keep in mind to combat it and also improve the quality of publications.

For example, we should always stay ethical. Young scientist Karen Stroobants proposed that an important complement to our doctorate would be to receive ethical training, which received general support. We can also ask senior colleagues in case we have ethical issues or even search for ethical guidelines such as proposed by the National Academy of Sciences. Staying ethical is, in fact, part of our responsibility to help us establish a trustful connection with the public.

 

Karen Stroobants, Michael Lerch and Director-General of the OPCW Ahmet Üzümcü during a panel discussion at the 67th Lindau Meeting. Photo/Credit: lvd/Lindau Nobel Laureate Mettings

Karen Stroobants, Michael Lerch and Ahmet Üzümcü, Director-General of the OPCW, during the panel discussion Ethics in Science at the 67th Lindau Meeting, Photo/Credit: Lisa Vincenz-Donnelly/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

Furthermore, publishing scientific work does not need to be limited to journals. Preprints precede journal publications and offer an attractive complement. Martin Chalfie highlighted the importance of preprints for open access, a fast time-stamp and potentially a more transparent reviewing process. The preprint archive arXiv has been accepted in the physics community since the 1990s. Currently, analogous preprint archives are being created in other communities too, so we should give them a try.

Martin Chalfie also taught us a remarkable exercise that he carries out in his group: a member of his group selects a preprinted paper on a cutting-edge topic related to their own research. They discuss this study during their group meetings, and constructive comments are sent to the preprint authors. This exercise raises new ideas in his group as well as in the authors’ one. It also helps to improve the quality of the future journal publication. This seems like a great scheme to adopt.

 

Martin Chalfie during his lecture at the 67th Lindau Meeting. Photo/Credit: Julia Nimke/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Martin Chalfie during his lecture at the 67th Lindau Meeting, Photo/Credit: Julia Nimke/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

The atmosphere of the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting was unique. I met inspiring colleagues from all over the world, with whom I shared very nice experiences. Taking part in the Lindau Meeting made us feel privileged. We do science because we are curious; we want to understand more about the universe. But we also should keep in mind that our work can have a long-lasting impact in society. I believe that many of the young scientists that I met will become future leaders. So, as young scientist Florencia Marchini said, “when one becomes conscious of the social and economic impact that our work can create, to take action is a matter of responsibility more than an obligation or a choice.” We do not need to open our eyes too wide to see all the problems that science and society are facing; it is our responsibility to get involved to solve them. We learned valuable lessons during the Lindau Meeting; now is the time to put them into practice and share them.

Focus on Africa: Advancing Science to Advance Humankind

One of the things I love about Lindau is that it is truly diverse and inclusive. This is the case from a disciplinary point of view, in that although this is a chemistry meeting, non-chemists are welcome – physicists, material scientists, engineers, and even maths-maniacs are encouraged to apply and attend. And Lindau is also diverse from a national standpoint – there are nerds from all over the world here. 80 countries are represented, as are numerous cultures, languages, religions and experiences.

On Monday morning, I had the privilege of attending the breakfast of the African delegation, a group of approximately 40 students and postdocs from many countries across all of Africa, including Senegal, Nigeria, Egypt, South Africa, Sudan, and Kenya. As we dined on fresh orange juice and fried eggs, I got chatting with a few young scientists who hail from Kenya, including Titus Masese, who is a Research Scientist at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) in Japan.

Based in Osaka, Masese, 33, has lived in Japan since he was 18 years old, when he was recruited to attend Kyoto University as a Japanese Government Scholar, a programme that brings talented Kenyan students to Japan. At Kyoto U, he received his Bachelors in materials science and engineering and his Masters and PhD in electrochemistry. He is fluent is Japanese, Swahili, Kisii (a traditional language from the region of Kenya in which he grew up) and English.

 

Young scientist Titus Masese and science writer Alaina Levine, Photo/Credit: Alaina G. Levine

Young scientist Titus Masese and science writer Alaina Levine, Photo/Credit: Alaina G. Levine

 

Masese, whose presence at Lindau is supported by both AIST and a Horst-Köhler-Fellowship (supported by the Robert Bosch Stiftung), and whose research focus is in energy storage (rechargeable batteries), spent some time speaking with me about his enthusiasm for attending Lindau. We also discussed the many bi-directional, multinational opportunities that can be leveraged for African scientific efforts in support of African innovators across the continent and across the world.

This is an especially important time for channels of communication to be expanded as it relates to financial support of science, no matter where in the world we pursue our work. As Masese notes, it is crucial for people from African nations to attend Lindau, because “in terms of science and technology, there is a lot of research in Africa, but it is not as well know, and it is not being [leveraged],” he says. “The Lindau Meeting is the right platform to showcase the research and to find collaborators so that we can further advance the work. Scientists in some countries in Africa don’t get enough funding from their governments, so they come to Lindau, and perhaps can get more funding as well as opportunities for partnerships.”

Africa is the cradle of mankind, and African researchers and research institutions are known world leaders in many areas of STEM, he shares, including anthropology, mineralogy, agriculture, horticulture and energy storage. And yet, “even with the abundance of natural resources and brilliant minds, there’s just not enough research funding,” he says.

In Masese’s native Kenya, chemistry research and application has led to major insights and innovation in the field and beyond, he says. For example, Kenyan chemists apply their chemistry knowhow to solve problems related to designing drugs to combat tropical diseases such as cholera and malaria, and in the field of anthropology, chemists collaborate with scientists around the world on projects involving carbon dating of artefacts. Geochemists here use their talents to understand, find and characterise minerals. There are also cutting-edge investigations being conducted on designing compounds that can absorb and remove carcinogenic pollutants, such as lead and arsenic, from water and other resources, and on tackling radioactive waste disposal.

Another area he is closely following is African research in the energy sector. “Energy storage and finding energy solutions is a global crisis,” he says. “I think African governments recognise this. They also recognise there is more work to be done in this area. So I encourage government representatives to speak with scientists and engineers in their nations, and leverage that talent and knowhow to make a greater impact in finding common-sense energy solutions.”

Although Masese is not working with Kenyan researchers at this time, he would certainly like to do so in the future if the funding is available and timing is right. He regularly interfaces with the Kenyan Embassy in Japan, and recently had lunch with the Ambassador, H.E. Mr. Solomon K. Maina, who “is appreciative of the work that Kenyans in Japan do,” he says.

 

African Outreach Breakfast during the 67th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, Picture/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

African Outreach Breakfast during the 67th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, Picture/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

 

Masese is optimistic that opportunity for strengthening national, international, and intercontinental partnerships for African scientists worldwide will emerge from strategic networking. “The Kenyans and Africans I’ve met say the same thing, whether they are from Senegal or Nigeria or live in other countries: we should form networks to unite together to do something for the African continent in terms of research.” Tools such as Facebook groups dedicated to fostering alliances between African scholars are helpful in this regard, serving as just one mechanism to bind together innovators who are scattered across the world but are members of the African diaspora. “I have met people in different fields and they are not being funded by African governments,” he adds. “We can form collaborations as we try to find ways to convince our governments to support important research.”

The future is bright for Africa’s scientific enterprises, and for Masese himself, who next year will be evaluated for a permanent position at AIST. One of the goals of some of Kenyan expats in Japan is to create a new research institution in Kenya. “We want to build one single institute that will do multidisciplinary research, and do cutting edge work that will be of benefit to the entire African community,” he says.

And his presence at Lindau is playing a role in inspiring him to think big. “We could build an African Young Scientist Summit, like the Lindau Meeting and similar conferences in Asia,” he says with a smile. “There is a lot of interesting research being done in Africa, despite the fact that there are not as many resources being devoted to these scholars. But there is a way to open it to the world, with meetings like Lindau. This meeting can make a difference and serve as an enzyme to advance scientific research across Africa.”

Imagine a World Without Electrical Sockets

Photo: Courtesy of Il Jeon

Photo: Courtesy of Il Jeon

My research involves the development of new materials and applying them to energy devices. There are three types of materials that I mainly focus on: carbon allotropes, transition metal dichalcogenides and organic surface modifiers. I produce and modify these materials to use them in photovoltaics, such as specific types of solar cells. As the paradigm of electronics is shifting to flexibility, low-cost and environmental friendliness, I believe replacing conventional materials by new materials that are flexible, cheaper and more ecological can keep energy devices abreast of this. Ultimately, we can expect to see devices that are fully composed of carbon allotropes, transition metal dichalcogenides and organic compounds. This will lead to a future of wearable energy technology in which people will treat solar energy the way we treat Wi-Fi and Bluetooth these days. Imagine charging your mobile phones from indoor lights and a world without electrical sockets. It goes without saying that this could solve the present-day energy and environmental issues.

 

Photo: Courtesy of Il Jeon

Photo: Courtesy of Il Jeon

There is a good reason why I am working on this research topic. I have had various research experiences both in academia and industry. Just like Steve Jobs said in the commencement address at Stanford, connecting dots is the root innovation that can lead to breakthroughs in science. Therefore, I wanted to connect the dots from my past career. I hold degrees in chemistry at undergraduate and graduate levels. This laid the foundation for the material studies that I am doing now. Then, the work experience at a South Korean conglomerate, LG Display Co. ltd., where I developed organic light emitting devices (OLED) and quantum dot displays, sparked my interest in energy devices. This is due to the fact that energy devices have a similar working mechanism to display devices, and I wanted to work on something that addresses the societal issues directly.

 

Photo: Courtesy of Il Jeon

Photo: Courtesy of Il Jeon

There are three key components to my research: growth, synthesis and fabrication. I grow carbon allotropes and transition metal dichalcogenides by using chemical vapour deposition, which is a chemical process to form a high quality material using high temperatures in a vacuum so that it does not catch fire. Once they are produced, I modify those using organic synthesis to render new functionalities to the materials. Various fullerene derivatives and modified graphene are good examples of this. These materials are characterised and utilised in solar cell fabrication. The end goal is to improve the performance of energy devices using newly developed materials. I generally spend half of my week on material development and the other half on device fabrication. Some people say that I cannot catch two hares at the same time and I should focus on either material science or device engineering. However, I am a competitive person so I believe you can catch more than two hares if you work just that much harder. 

Final Preparations: Lindau Calling! (#LiNo17)

In just a few days, Lindau’s Stadttheater (= city theatre) will open its doors to a week full of science, inspirational exchange and education. We, the organising team of the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings, are very much looking forward to having this incredible number of bright minds here on our small island.

 

26.06.2016, Lindau, Germany

The 67th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting will take place in Lindau’s city theatre. Photo/Credit: Julia Nimke/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

By now, you’ve probably gone through the numerous different phases of preparation, perhaps even packing. So let us give you some last minute guidance and lists for repacking your gear.

 

The Programme

Perhaps you’ve already gotten around to checking this year’s meeting programme. If not, don’t worry – here’s the link to the full programme booklet.

 

65th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, Lindau, Germany Wednesday, 91/07/2015 Lecture Martin Chalfie Picture/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Nobel Laureate Martin Chalfie at #LiNo15. Picture/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

Getting Here

As there will not be any shuttle buses to Lindau that are organised by us, you will have to organise your trip to Lindau by yourself.

Most likely, you’ll be arriving in Lindau by train. All airports you might be flying into offer connections to “Lindau Hbf” (the train station to head to) via train. You can either buy a ticket at the train stations or via www.bahn.com. You have arrived in Lindau as soon as you see water to your left, to your right and in front of you. Welcome to Lake Constance!

 

Registration

In order to take advantage of everything Lindau has to offer, you need to register with us and get your conference materials. Upon registration, you will receive your name badge, which indicates to our staff which events you will attend, your personal agenda, the final programme and more.

Registration will take place in the gym of the primary school (Turnhalle) opposite the back entrance of this year’s meeting venue Stadttheater and open on Saturday, 24 June from 3 p.m. until 6 p.m and Sunday, 25 June from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m. Please note that you will have to show a valid ID at the registration desk.

 

Everything Else You Need to Know

The opening ceremony starts on Sunday at 4 p.m., and the Stadttheater will open its doors at 3 p.m. For security reasons, it is not allowed to bring any large bags. For your convenience, there is a depository truck where your luggage will be securely stored just outside the Stadttheater next to the Turnhalle. You will have to have your name badge and valid ID-card with you for access.

For a Google Map with all the important places in Lindau, please click here (or check the meeting app): 

 

What to Bring & What to Wear

There is no dress code for the regular scientific sessions. For invitational dinners, you may want to bring something more festive (suits, cocktail dresses). As the lake is great for swimming, you may want to bring swim wear. Some of the local swimming pools even offer free entrance for the participants of the Lindau Meeting. Sunscreen and mosquito repellents are a good idea as well. 

Make sure to bring comfortable shoes that are suitable for cobblestone roads and different weather conditions. A hairdryer may be useful as well as a voltage converter (220 volt) or adapter as German socket-outlets vary from those abroad.

Over the last years, one of the events has become particularly popular among all participants: the “Bavarian Evening” hosted by the Free State of Bavaria. For this, it is a great idea to wear a traditional festive costume from your home country. Those of you who own a traditional Bavarian costume (a Dirndl dress for women and Lederhosen for men) are more than welcome to wear that instead.

 

At the Bavarian evening, everyone is invited to wear the traditional outfit of their home country. Photo/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

At the Bavarian evening, everyone is invited to wear the traditional outfit of their home country. Photo/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

Morning Workouts

For those of you participating in the morning workouts: please bring comfortable sportswear, a towel and sturdy sneakers. Water bottles will be provided upon registration.

 

Internet & Phones

The meeting venue is equipped with wireless LAN (WiFi). Special log-in credentials will not be required – just follow the instructions.

It’s always helpful if you bring along your mobile phone so that we will be able to contact you easily. To use a mobile phone in a German network, it needs to support the GSM standard (used all over Europe). The German country code is +49.

 

Money

The currency used in Germany and many European countries (except Switzerland) is the Euro. Money can be exchanged at airports or at local banks. Credit cards (e.g. Visa, Mastercard) and Maestro/EC cards can be used to withdraw money from ATMs (called “Geldautomaten”) using your PIN. Please check the map to see where to find the nearest ATMs. Cheques and traveller cheques have become rather uncommon and are hardly accepted anywhere.

 

Nobel Laureate Steven Chu talking to young scientists at #LiNo16. Picture/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Nobel Laureate Steven Chu talking to young scientists at #LiNo16. Picture/Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

Emergencies

In case of an emergency at the main meeting venue, please contact the staff. Please note that our staff is not authorised to hand out any medication. A paramedic team is present at the meeting venue and can help with all health-related issues. If you have an emergency at a different location, please either contact any of the staff if present, or call 112, the official emergency number that will work in all of the EU countries and in Switzerland. During the meeting, you will be covered by a health insurance policy provided by the organisers.

 

The Meeting App

As last year, there will be a conference app available at this year’s Lindau Meeting. All the information from this post can also be found in there (…and more!). For an in-depth explanation on how to get started with the app, please refer to my colleague Christoph’s guide.

 

Last but Not Least

If you want to get a taste of the “Lindau spirit” prior to the meeting, you are invited to take a look at our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter (@lindaunobel) and Instagram (@lindaunobel). Throughout the week of the meeting, we will try to post as much interesting content as possible via #LiNo17, this year’s official hashtag. Do join the conversation – we’d be happy!

My colleagues and I will be happy to assist you at the Young Scientist Help Desk, should you have any questions. It is going to be a great week, so let’s make the most of it!

And finally, if you haven’t seen them yet, take a look at our new bags, which will soon be yours ;-)

 

Nadine, Nesrin and Karen – always there to help you out during your time in Lindau! Photo/Credit: Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

Big Data Analytics Deliver Materials Science Insights

Finding patterns and structure in big data of materials science remains challenging, so researchers are working on new ways to mine the data to uncover hidden relationships. Credit: Hamster3d/iStock.com

Finding patterns and structure in big data of materials science remains challenging, so researchers are working on new ways to mine the data to uncover hidden relationships. Credit: Hamster3d/iStock.com

 

Developing new materials can be a lengthy, difficult process and innovations in the field come through a combination of serendipity and methodical hard work. Researchers perform many rounds of synthesising new materials and testing their properties, using their chemical knowledge and intuition to relate a material’s structure to its function. The result is materials for tough body armour, thin, powerful batteries or lightweight aircraft components, among many other applications.

To speed materials discovery, researchers are now asking computers to help. Algorithms similar to those that organise our email, photos and online banking can also be used to find patterns in chemical data that relate to a material’s structure and composition.

Photo: R. Schultes/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Walter Kohn, Nobel Laureate in Chemistry 1998. Photo: R. Schultes/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Traditional computer modelling of materials uses methods recognised with the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1998. Walter Kohn and John Pople shared the prize that year for developing algorithms that modelled molecules using quantum mechanics, improving the accuracy of molecular structure and chemical reactivity calculations. The techniques that Kohn and Pople each developed revolutionised computational chemistry and have continued to be improved to give highly accurate results.

These methods typically work well to predict structural and electronic properties of crystalline metals and metal oxides. But these predictions do not always match measured properties of complex bulk materials and their surfaces under experimental conditions. Predicting properties of bulk materials and their surfaces using current quantum mechanical methods requires lengthy calculations using supercomputers.

To speed up these calculations, chemists are analysing public databases of atomic, chemical and physical properties to find combinations that predict materials properties. They use big-data analytics tools to search for meaningful patterns in the large amounts of data. Algorithms like this already influence our daily lives by filtering spam email, suggesting other items for online shoppers, detecting faces in digital photos, and identifying fraudulent credit card transactions. Although materials scientists have much less data than email providers or online stores, there is still enough publicly available data about atomic properties such as electronegativity, atomic radius and bonding geometry as well as the geometric and electronic structures of various materials that the same analysis tools are still useful. Materials databases include Materials Project in the United States and the Novel Materials Discovery Laboratory in Europe, among others.

Computational materials discovery often involves making predictions for an entire class of materials, such as metals, metal oxides or semiconductors. However, a global prediction may not apply to certain subgroups of materials within that class.

Bryan Goldsmith, a Humboldt postdoctoral fellow at the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Plank Society in Berlin and a young scientist attending the 67th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting and his colleagues recently applied a data analytics tool called subgroup discovery to see how physical and chemical properties relate to the structure of gold nanoclusters containing varying numbers of atoms. Gold clusters are a model example of how materials properties change from the bulk to nanoscale. Bulk gold is shiny, inert and yellow in color. Gold nanoparticles, however, are red, catalytic and have dynamic structures.

 

The Novel Materials Discovery Laboratory, a European Center of Excellence established in the fall of 2015, has the world’s largest collection of computational materials science data.

 

Using molecular dynamics simulations, the researchers calculated 24,400 independent configurations of neutral, gas-phase gold clusters containing 5 to 14 atoms at temperatures from -173 to 541 °C (100 to 814K). Next, they predicted the ionisation potential, electron affinity and van der Waals forces between atoms in a cluster, among other properties.

Then the researchers generated various mathematical combinations of the predicted chemical data to produce a large number of possible relationships between different subgroups of gold clusters. Finally, they used subgroup discovery to find the relationships that best predicted cluster structure and their electronic properties.

The algorithm rediscovered the known property that gold nanoclusters with even number of atoms are semiconducting, whereas those with an odd number of atoms are metallic. It also revealed something new about forces that stabilise nonplanar gold clusters: van der Waals forces typically thought to stabilise interactions between molecules contributed more to the stability of nonplanar clusters than planar clusters.

 

A computational prediction for a group of gold nanoclusters (global model) could miss patterns unique to nonplaner clusters (subgroup 1) or planar clusters (subgroup 2). Credit: New J. Phys.

A computational prediction for a group of gold nanoclusters (global model) could miss patterns unique to nonplaner clusters (subgroup 1) or planar clusters (subgroup 2). Credit: Goldsmith et al. Uncovering structure-property relationships of materials by subgroup discovery. New J. Phys. 19 (2017) 013031 (CC BY 3.0)

By starting their data analytics with known properties, the researchers hope to develop predictive models that retain physical and chemical information that is easy for other scientists to interpret, Goldsmith says. “We believe that if you can find these simple equations, they can help guide you to deeper understanding, and hopefully lead to new chemistry and materials insights.”

With more powerful computers, larger databases and novel ways to use the data being developed, data analytics could become increasingly important to researchers synthesising new materials. A database of failed reactions could guide the direction of future experiments, and data analytics tools could speed the interpretation of spectra used to characterise molecules and materials. And in time, researchers hope to predict the outcome of a catalytic reaction or materials synthesis. “Data analytics should be an indispensable part of every chemist and material’s scientist toolkit,” Goldsmith says.

What If You Could Spend a Week with Nobel Laureates?

We asked several of the young scientists who will be attending the 67th Lindau Nobel Laureates Meeting about their expectations for their week in Lindau. Here are a few select answers:

 

Matias Acosta, Technische Universität Darmstadt:

What would you do if you could meet your role model face to face? What if you could actually spend a week with him or her? This idyllic scenario comes true for us, young scientists, each year during the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting. We can meet not one, but many Nobel Laureates and enjoy  their companionship and enriching discussions during one week. How to react and what to expect from this scenario?

I would love to hear how the Nobel Laureates cope with pressure or distractions. What drives them to continue on their way to success? There are of course many questions that I would like to ask at this point. The most important one would be whether the efforts were worth it.

I am sure that obtaining a Nobel Laureate is a life-changing event. The awarded becomes instantly the role model of thousands of young scientists or even of non-academic people. I would like to know about the feelings of the Nobel Laureate when he or she hears that he or she is someone’s role model. Being the role model of many people is not easy. It brings along new duties and responsibilities that I would be very interested to hear. Even more importantly, I would be glad to know how the Nobel Laureate uses these new possibilities and responsibilities to make positive change.

Matias Acosta, Technische Universität Darmstadt

Photo: Courtesy of Matias Acosta

 

Il Jeon, The University of Tokyo:

Amongst many things that I expect from the Lindau Meeting, I have to say networking is the most important one. Through proactive interaction with the qualified scientist froms around the world, I want to form a network of research collaboration.

I am also very keen on the panel discussions. While interacting with the Nobel laureates is of the utmost importance, discussing with other scientists under the supervision of the senior scientists is equally important.

Il Jeon, The University of TokyoPhoto: Courtesy of Il Jeon

 

Funeka Nkosi, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Pretoria, South Africa:

It is a lifetime opportunity and I am grateful for this opportunity. That is why I want to make the most out of this opportunity. I desire to meet at least 30 of the Nobel Laureates coming to the meeting.  To engage with them and other young scientists, exchange ideas and views. I want to learn from them, be inspired and motivated to do great work in science.  I hope my participation in this meeting will result in the development of international research networks that will result in scientific collaborations which will be helpful in growing the research in lithium-ion batteries and energy storage materials in South Africa.

Photo: Courtesy of Funeka NkosiPhoto: Courtesy of Funeka Nkosi

 

Shrikrishnan Sankaran, INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials, Saarbrücken:

This meeting has an excellent selection of Nobel Laureates from way in the past to very recent. I am very eager to learn about their approach to science, career paths, challenges and personal attitudes. Apart from their scientific brilliance, I believe several other personality and environment based factors play a great role in their success. These are some of the things I hope to learn about at this meeting.

Apart from the Laureates, I also expect to have inspiring exchanges with other young and passionate scientists attending the meeting.

Photo: Courtesy of Shrikrishnan Sankaran.Photo: Courtesy of Shrikrishnan Sankaran

 

Ana Torres, Texas A&M University:

I feel pleased to be part of the upcoming 67th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting. I am personally delighted and professionally motivated to be part of this unique event as a proud representative of Mexico. Along my young academic life in Chemistry, I have been inspired in many ways by important and laureate scientists. It could be an honor to have the opportunity to get to know them better and to listen to their personal and academic experiences. Moreover, to exchange professional interests and key concerns of science in such inspiring atmosphere will surely enrich my life and empower me as a woman scientist to reach my goal to pursue an academic job in theoretical chemistry. This opportunity is coming at the right time when I needed encouragement to establish collaborations and go ahead in the next step of my professional life.

Photo: Courtesy of Ana Torres.Photo: Courtesy of Ana Torres

Mittagessen mit Steven Chu

Doktorandin Susanne Birkhold nahm an der 66. Lindauer Nobelpreisträgertagung teil. Lest hier, was sie am meisten beeindruckt hat:

In den fünf Tagen während der Lindauer Nobelpreisträgertagung ist die Altstadt von Lindau voller junger Wissenschaftler aus der ganzen Welt. Rund um die Uhr finden Veranstaltungen statt, um den Austausch zwischen Wissenschaftlern unterschiedlichster Kulturen, Disziplinen und Generationen zu fördern. Im Sommer 2016 war diese Tagung der Physik gewidmet und ich hatte die einmalige Gelegenheit, daran teilzunehmen.

Im Zuge meiner Doktorarbeit im Fachbereich Physik der Universität Konstanz untersuche ich alternative Halbleiter für die Anwendung in der Photovoltaik. Die Herstellung dieser Halbleiter aus flüssigen Lösungen bietet die Möglichkeit, Produktionskosten von Solarzellen deutlich zu reduzieren sowie neue Anwendungsbereiche zu erschließen, etwa durch flexible Solarmodule. Da ich mich während meiner Promotion täglich mit einem sehr speziellen Thema beschäftige, war die Lindauer Nobelpreisträgertagung eine spannende Gelegenheit mit den besten Wissenschaftlern verschiedenster Forschungsgebiete in Kontakt zu kommen und von den neusten Errungenschaften in der Physik aus erster Hand zu erfahren. Dabei standen spezielle Themen, wie die erst kürzlich gemessenen Gravitationswellen, das Potential von Quantencomputern sowie aktuelle Erkenntnisse über das Standardmodell der Elementarteilchen im Fokus. Hierüber wurde während einer Live-Übertragung von Wissenschaftlern, die am Teilchenbeschleuniger in CERN arbeiten, berichtet.

Das tägliche Programm startete mit Science Breakfasts, gefolgt von Vorträgen der einzelnen Nobelpreisträger, kleineren Workshops und Fragerunden sowie unterschiedlichen Abendveranstaltungen, um den kulturellen Austausch zu fördern. Neben vielen physikalischen Themen gab es auch interessante fachfremde Vorträge, wie zum Beispiel von Vinton Cerf über die „Erfindung“ des Internets oder von Roy Glauber, der als 18-Jähriger für das Manhattan-Projekt rekrutiert wurde und über seine Eindrücke während der Entwicklung der Atombombe berichtete.

 

Susanne Birkhold mit ACMTuring-Preisträger Vinton Cerf auf der 66. Lindauer Nobelpreisträgertagung. Bild: Susanne Birkhold.

Susanne Birkhold mit ACM Turing-Preisträger Vinton Cerf auf der 66. Lindauer Nobelpreisträgertagung. Bild: Susanne Birkhold.

Doch auch die Nachwuchswissenschaftler hatten die Chance, über ihre Forschung zu berichten. Im Rahmen meines Vortrags in der Master Class zum Thema Klimawandel konnte ich mich zum einen intensiv mit anderen vortragenden Wissenschaftlern über dringende Fragen des Klimawandels austauschen und zum anderen den Organisator der Master Class, Steven Chu, kennenlernen. Während eines Mittagessens mit Steven Chu, der 1997 seinen Nobelpreis für das Kühlen und Einfangen von Atomen mit Laserlicht erhielt und im Kabinett von US-Präsidenten Barack Obama das Amt des Energieministers bekleidete, unterhielten wir uns über die langfristigen Folgen des Klimawandels, die internationale Klimapolitik und die Frage, warum unsere Gesellschaft die Gefahren des Klimawandels nicht ernster nimmt. Die Einschätzungen und Meinungen von Steven Chu haben mich nachhaltig beeindruckt und mein Bewusstsein über die Folgen des Klimawandels gestärkt.

 

Susanne Birkhold traf auf der 66. Lindauer Tagung auch Nobelpreisträger Steven Chu. Bild: Susanne Birkhold.

Susanne Birkhold traf auf der 66. Lindauer Tagung auch Nobelpreisträger Steven Chu. Bild: Susanne Birkhold.

Diese persönlichen Begegnungen waren wohl die spannendsten Erfahrungen während meiner Teilnahme an der Lindauer Nobelpreisträgertagung. Durch den Austausch mit Wissenschaftlern aus allen Karrierestufen konnte ich viel über die Herausforderungen einer langfristigen Karriere in der Wissenschaft lernen und hilfreiche Ratschläge für erfolgreiche wissenschaftliche Arbeit erhalten. Dank der einmaligen Internationalität der Tagung traf ich Nachwuchswissenschaftler aus den unterschiedlichsten Ländern, von Kuba bis Südafrika, und erhielt interessante Einblicke in ihre jeweiligen Länder und Kulturen. All diese Erlebnisse und Begegnungen haben mich überaus bereichert und mich für meine Forschung motiviert. Zukünftigen Teilnehmern empfehle ich daher nicht schüchtern zu sein und jede Möglichkeit für spannende Unterhaltungen oder für die Teilnahme an Workshops und Events wahrzunehmen, um möglichst viele eindrucksvolle Erfahrungen während der Lindauer Nobelpreisträgertagung zu sammeln.

 

So erlebte Nachwuchswissenschaftler Oliver Kliebisch die 66. Lindauer Nobelpreisträgertagung:

Als Doktorand im Fachbereich Physik der Universität Konstanz forsche ich auf dem Gebiet der Laserphysik und nichtlinearen Optik. Bei meinem Projekt entwickle und verwende ich ein Lasersystem, welches ultrakurze Laserimpulse mit Pulswiederholraten im Gigahertz-Bereich erzeugt. Mit diesen lassen sich die Eigenschaften von Festkörpern untersuchen, wobei ich mich mit speziell designten Halbleiter-Schichtsystemen beschäftige. Während meines Studiums habe ich bereits von den Nobelpreisträgertagungen erfahren und habe mich sehr gefreut, als meine Universität mich für die 66. Tagung vorgeschlagen hat und ich mich schließlich erfolgreich für die Teilnahme bewerben konnte.

Die Hauptveranstaltungen der 66. Lindauer Tagung fanden anders als in den Vorjahren im Stadttheater Lindau statt. Dort bekamen wir, die 400 „Young Scientists“, die besondere Gelegenheit rund 30 Nobelpreisträger verschiedener Disziplinen sowie den Turing-Preisträger Vinton Cerf zu treffen. In ihren Vorträgen stellten uns die Preisträger ihre nobelpreiswürdige Forschung vor, berichteten über aktuelle Fragestellungen und Erkenntnisse oder diskutierten diese in Podiumsdiskussionen. Darüber hinaus hatten wir die Gelegenheit, mit jeweils einem einzelnen Preisträger in kleinerer Runde zu sprechen. Aufgrund der Nähe zu meinem Forschungsthema habe ich mich besonders gefreut, mich direkt mit Theodor Hänsch austauschen zu können. Ein umfangreiches Rahmenprogramm rundete die Tagung ab. So besuchten wir unter anderem die Bregenzer Seebühne, erlebten den „Bayerischen Abend“ und ließen schließlich die Tagung bei einer Podiumsdiskussion zum Thema Wissenschaftsdidaktik und anschließendem Picknick auf der Blumeninsel Mainau ausklingen.

Mit anderen Teilnehmern, die zum Großteil ebenfalls Doktoranden oder PostDocs waren, tauschte ich mich auch über Zukunftspläne aus, insbesondere darüber, ob man auf seinem weiteren Weg in der akademischen Forschung verbleibt oder in die Industrie wechselt.

Besonders beeindruckt hat mich das Gespräch mit Roy Glauber, der uns von seinen Erlebnissen als Mitarbeiter am Manhattan-Projekt berichtete. Er erzählte von seinen persönlichen Begegnungen mit prägenden Wissenschaftlern des 20. Jahrhunderts wie Richard Feynman, Albert Einstein, Wolfgang Pauli und Enrico Fermi. Solch ein persönlicher Einblick in die Wissenschaftsgeschichte und seine privaten Erlebnisse mit diesen bekannten Größen hat mich und viele andere junge Wissenschaftler äußerst fasziniert. Wer die Chance hat, an einer zukünftigen Nobelpreisträgertagung teilzunehmen, sollte gerade die Möglichkeiten nutzen, in den direkten Kontakt mit Preisträgern zu treten. Alle Preisträger waren sehr offen und haben bereitwillig viele spannende Erlebnisse aus ihren langjährigen Forschungserfahrungen mit uns geteilt.

 

Die Teilnahme von Susanne Birkhold und Oliver Kliebisch an der 66. Lindauer Tagung wurde von der Internationalen Bodensee-Hochschule (IBH) unterstützt.