Boosting Photosynthesis to Meet Rising Food Demand

The issue of food is perhaps somewhat overlooked among the many challenges faced by mankind but the truth is that world demand is steadily increasing and by 2050, could be almost twice that of 2005. More alarmingly, based on the calculations of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, if things continue as they are, we are not going to meet this increased demand. Will upgrading the basic chemical reaction underlying the growth of all plants allow us to meet the challenge?

Several causes underlie the expected need for more food. First and foremost, it is simply a consequence of there being more of us: by 2050 there may be over two billion more humans living on planet earth. A further reason is increasing living standards across the globe; as these are rising, so too is the demand for better quality food (and more of it). Further, the last decade has witnessed an explosion in the use of grain to make biofuel in developed countries, diverting it from its potential use as a foodstuff.  So, how are we to ramp up food production and meet this shortfall? And further, how can we do it in a sustainable way that does not exacerbate already existing problems such as water shortage and climate change?

 

Although agricultural efficiency has increased significantly over the course of the last decades, evidence suggests that crop yields are now plateauing. Novel solutions are urgently needed to meet the world's increasing demand for food. Credit: valio84sl/iStock.com

Although agricultural efficiency has increased significantly over the course of the last decades, evidence suggests that crop yields are now plateauing. Novel solutions are urgently needed to meet the world’s increasing demand for food. Photo: valio84sl/iStock.com

 

The central strategies that have underpinned decades of increasing crop yield involve either increasing the amount of land used for agriculture, or maximizing the amount of food that can be grown on the land already in use. However, many experts in the field believe that conventional strategies based on efficient use of water and fertilizers as well as other approaches have now been exhausted. Indeed, the yield of some of the main staples of the human diet worldwide such as rice and wheat has plateaued in recent years. What are the remaining options? This question among others was also debated by the participants in a discussion which took place at the 63rd Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in 2013.

Harvesting the power of transgenic technology, which means taking a gene responsible for a given trait from one organism and transferring it to a second species, could be a potential solution to the problem. However, this approach remains highly controversial, not least because common strategies include the engineering of genetically modified (GM) variants that harbour genes providing resistance to harsh environmental conditions, disease and, crucially, to antibiotics. A major concern related to this approach is that these genes might be easily transferred to other pest species, resulting in “super weeds” that cannot be eradicated. However, another distinct strategy has also taken shape in the last 20 years: one which seeks not to make plants hardier, but rather to boost the basic process underlying all plant growth.

The evolution of photosynthesis, the process by which plants convert carbon dioxide into sugar and water in the presence of sunlight, was of crucial importance to the development of life on earth. Not surprisingly, several Nobel Prizes have been awarded to scientists whose work has helped to characterise the factors involved and to unravel the basic mechanism of the reaction. Most directly, the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1988 was jointly awarded to Hartmut Michel, Robert Huber, and Johannes Deisenhofer “for the determination of the three-dimensional structure of a photosynthetic reaction centre”. Now, this chemical reaction, which has done so much to promote life on this planet and the evolution of ever more complex lifeforms, may hold the key to ensuring that our increasing needs for food are met. It has been proposed that if photosynthesis, and thus the production of sugar, can be fine-tuned and upgraded, then this will lead to bigger plants, bigger yields and ultimately, more food.

 

Johann Deisenhofer during his 2016 Lindau Lecture. We are looking forward to his lecture at #LiNo17! Credit: Christian Flemming/LNLM

Johann Deisenhofer during his 2016 Lindau Lecture. We are looking forward to his lecture at #LiNo17! Photo: Christian Flemming/LNLM

 

It may come as a surprise, but the chemical reaction that has been evolving over the last 3.5 billion years and which underlies all life on earth is actually relatively inefficient in several aspects. When we talk about photosynthetic efficiency what we are actually talking about is the percentage of light energy that is finally converted into chemical energy in the form of glucose. The inefficiency is already pre-set by the fact that only a fraction of the spectrum of sunlight is actually used for photosynthesis. Chlorophyll, the green pigment that gives leaves their colour, is most efficient at capturing the light that we can see – the red and blue light which makes up less than half of the total light that reaches our planet from the sun. The inefficiency is compounded by the fact that plants cannot use all of the energy contained in the sunlight that they absorb. To avoid damage to the components of the photosynthetic reaction and to the organism as a whole, the excess energy is converted to heat and is dissipated from the plant. This important protective mechanism is termed non-photochemical quenching (more of which later).

The strategies aimed at increasing photosynthetic efficiency take many forms. In fact, one of the critical enzymes required for photosynthesis, RuBisCo (short for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) is itself rather slow and inefficient. Thus, several laboratories worldwide are attempting to engineer versions of the protein that harbour more efficient enzymatic activity. The concentration of carbon dioxide is another important factor in photosynthesis. Thus, further strategies to optimise photosynthesis include simply increasing the local concentration of carbon dioxide in the immediate vicinity of plants, or improving the ability of plants to take it up and use it.

Until recently, however, the feasibility of all of these strategies was based mainly on preliminary evidence and in some cases the ideas remained just that, ideas. The overall concept of enhancing photosynthesis, the process ultimately underlying all plant growth, is undeniably attractive – but will it really work?     

 

Decades of research has gone into understanding the mechanism of photosynthesis. These insights are now being utilised by researchers who, by boosting and upgrading the efficiency of the reaction, hope to increase crop yields and ensure the future of our food supply. Credit: alvarez/iStock.com

Decades of research has gone into understanding the mechanism of photosynthesis. These insights are now being utilised by researchers who, by boosting and upgrading the efficiency of the reaction, hope to increase crop yields and ensure the future of our food supply. Photo: alvarez/iStock.com

 

Then, in the autumn of last year, arrived a study which goes some distance to demonstrating that the promise of boosting photosynthesis can be translated into tangible gains in crop yield, in this case tobacco. The authors, a team led by Krishna K. Niyogi and Stephen P. Long, and comprising researchers based in the US, UK and Poland, took a rigorously systematic approach and started by simulating the chemical process of photosynthesis in its entirety in order to identify potential steps where intervention may optimise the reaction. The scientists soon realised that the fact that plants absorb much more energy from the sun than they can use may hold the answer. In response to harsh direct sunlight, plants activate non-photochemical quenching immediately to protect themselves and their photosynthetic enzymes. However, when it comes to switching the mechanism off again, they are not as efficient. It can take as long as 30 minutes, time during which photosynthetic activity is dampened. The authors calculated that under conditions when light is fluctuating, overall yield could be decreased by as much as 30 percent. To try and tackle this question, and to promote faster resumption of photosynthesis upon exposure to sunlight, the team led by Niyogi and Long genetically engineered tobacco to express higher amounts of three key proteins that speed up the resumption of photosynthesis in conditions of fluctuating light. In unprecedented results, the genetically modified plants gave yields that were on average 15 percent higher than unmodified tobacco. The researchers are now applying their approach to rice and other important food crops. 

Scientists working at Rothamsted Research in the UK, the world’s oldest agricultural research institute, also recently claimed to have made significant breakthroughs in boosting photosynthesis to improve crop yield. They have taken a different approach to improving the efficiency of photosynthesis: they increased the expression of the enzyme Sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase (SBPase). Their initial trials under greenhouse conditions showed significant increases in wheat yield and researchers are now testing whether these will also be observed in wheat grown in the field.

Decades of research, much of it crowned with Nobel Prizes, has gone into understanding the players and mechanisms involved in photosynthesis. With good reason: understanding how photosynthesis works may secure the future of our food supply. The recent successes with translating basic insights into tangible increases in crop yield suggest that we may soon begin to harvest the fruits of this approach. Watch this space.

Können Superpflanzen unser Hungerproblem lösen?

Unter den vielen Herausforderungen der Menschheit wird das Nahrungsmittelproblem zuweilen fast übersehen. Fakt ist jedoch, dass die Nachfrage nach Nahrungsmitteln weltweit ständig zunimmt und sie bis zum Jahr 2050 doppelt so hoch sein könnte wie 2005. Was noch alarmierender ist: Wenn die Dinge so weiterlaufen wie bisher, werden wir diese steigende Nachfrage – so die Berechnungen der UN-Welternährungsorganisation – nicht mehr befriedigen können. Könnten wir dieses Problem lösen, indem wir die chemische Reaktion beschleunigen, die Pflanzen für ihr Wachstum nutzen?

Die steigende Nachfrage nach Nahrungsmitteln hat mehrere Gründe. Ein Grund ist, dass die Weltbevölkerung stetig wächst: Bis 2050 dürften auf dem Planeten Erde noch einmal zwei Milliarden mehr Menschen leben als heute. Ein weiterer Grund ist der weltweit steigende Lebensstandard. Denn mit ihm steigt gleichzeitig die Nachfrage nach höherwertigen Lebensmitteln (und größeren Mengen davon). Zudem ist in den Industrieländern der Verbrauch von Getreide für die Herstellung von Biokraftstoffen in den letzten zehn Jahren explosionsartig angestiegen – Getreide, das somit nicht als Nahrungsmittel dienen kann. Wie also können wir mehr Lebensmittel produzieren, um diesen Mangel auszugleichen? Und wie können wir dies tun ohne die bereits bestehenden Probleme wie Wasserknappheit oder Klimawandel nicht noch zu verschärfen?

 

Zwar hat die Effizienz der landwirtschaftlichen Produktion in den letzten Jahrzehnten enorm zugenommen, allerdings sieht es so aus, als wenn die heutigen Ernteerträge kaum noch steigerungsfähig sind. Um den stetig wachsenden Bedarf befriedigen zu können, müssen dringend neuartige Lösungen her. Credit: valio84sl/iStock.com

Zwar hat die Effizienz der landwirtschaftlichen Produktion in den letzten Jahrzehnten enorm zugenommen, allerdings sieht es so aus, als wenn die heutigen Ernteerträge kaum noch steigerungsfähig sind. Um den stetig wachsenden Bedarf befriedigen zu können, müssen dringend neuartige Lösungen her. Credit: valio84sl/iStock.com

 

Um höhere Ernteerträge zu erzielen, setzte die Landwirtschaft bisher vor allem auf zwei Strategien: Entweder werden größere Flächen Land bewirtschaftet oder auf den bereits genutzten Flächen werden größere Mengen angebaut. Allerdings gehen viele Experten davon aus, dass diese konventionellen Konzepte, die auf einer effizienteren Wasser- und Düngemittelnutzung basieren, sowie anderen Ansätzen nun erschöpft sind. So haben sich die Ernteerträge unserer Hauptnahrungsmittel, einschließlich Reis und Weizen, in den letzten Jahren bereits auf hohem Niveau eingependelt. Welche Optionen bleiben noch? Dies war eine der Fragen, denen auch die Teilnehmer einer Diskussion während der 63. Lindauer Nobelpreisträgertagung im Jahr 2013 nachgingen.

Eine mögliche Lösung könnte die transgene Technologie bieten. Bei dieser übertragen Wissenschaftler ein für eine bestimmte Eigenschaft verantwortliches Gen von einem Organismus auf eine andere Spezies. Allerdings wird diese Methode sehr kontrovers diskutiert – nicht zuletzt, weil sie häufig dazu genutzt wird, gentechnisch veränderte (GM) Varianten zu erzeugen, die besonders widerstandsfähig gegen raue Umweltbedingungen, Krankheiten und vor allem auch Antibiotika sind. Eine Hauptsorge dabei ist, dass diese Gene leicht auf Schädlinge übertragen werden könnten. Auf diese Weise könnten „Superunkräuter“ heranwachsen, die sich nicht so leicht wieder vernichten lassen. Doch in den letzten 20 Jahren hat sich eine weitere mögliche Strategie herausgebildet: Anstatt Pflanzen widerstandsfähiger zu machen, soll der Prozess, der ihrem Wachstum zugrunde liegt, angekurbelt werden.

Die Evolution der Photosynthese, der Reaktion, in der Pflanzen Kohlendioxid mit Hilfe von Sonnenlicht in Zucker und Wasser verwandeln, ist für die Entwicklung des Lebens auf der Erde von entscheidender Bedeutung. Da verwundert es nicht, dass gleich mehrere Nobelpreise Wissenschaftler ehren, welche die Grundmechanismen der Photosynthese aufgeklärt haben. So wurde 1988 der Nobelpreis für Chemie Hartmut Michel, Robert Huber und Johannes Deisenhofer „für die Erforschung der dreidimensionalen Struktur des Reaktionszentrums der Photosynthese“ zuerkannt. Diese chemische Reaktion, die so viel zur Förderung des Lebens und zur Evolution immer komplexerer Lebensformen auf diesem Planeten beigetragen hat, könnte der Schlüssel zur Erfüllung des zunehmenden Nahrungsmittelbedarfs der Menschen sein. Wenn die Photosynthese und damit die Produktion von Zucker weiterentwickelt und zielführend geregelt werden könnte, so der Ansatz, führt das zu größeren Pflanzen, höheren Erträgen und letztendlich mehr Nahrungsmitteln.

 

Johann Deisenhofer während seines Vortrags bei der 66. Lindauer Tagung im Jahr 2016. Wir freuen uns auf seinen Vortrag bei der #LiNo17! Credit: Christian Flemming/LNLM

Johann Deisenhofer während seines Vortrags bei der 66. Lindauer Tagung im Jahr 2016. Wir freuen uns auf seinen Vortrag bei der #LiNo17! Credit: Christian Flemming/LNLM

 

Es mag überraschen, aber tatsächlich ist die chemische Reaktion, die sich über die letzten 3,5 Milliarden Jahre entwickelt hat und dem gesamten Leben auf der Erde zugrunde liegt, in vielerlei Hinsicht relativ ineffizient. Effizienz bedeutet in diesem Fall, welcher Prozentsatz an Lichtenergie in chemische Energie in Form von Glukose umgewandelt wird. Eine Ineffizienz ist schon allein dadurch gegeben, dass die Photosynthese überhaupt nur einen Bruchteil des Sonnenlichtspektrums verwertet. Chlorophyll, das grüne Pigment, das Blättern ihre Farbe verleiht, ist am effizientesten bei der Aufnahme des für uns sichtbaren Lichts – des roten und blauen Lichts, das weniger als die Hälfte des Gesamtsonnenlichtes ausmacht, das unseren Planeten erreicht. Zusätzlich wird die Ineffizienz noch durch die Tatsache verstärkt, dass Pflanzen nur einen Teil der Energie, die sie über das Sonnenlicht aufnehmen, verwerten können. Um Schäden an Komponenten der Photosynthese und auch an der gesamten Pflanze zu vermeiden, wird überschüssige Energie in Hitze umgewandelt und von der Pflanze abgegeben. Dieser bedeutende Schutzmechanismus wird als „non-photochemical quenching“ bezeichnet (eine Fluoreszenzlöschung auf nichtphotochemischem Wege, dazu später mehr).

Wie kann die Photosynthese effizienter werden? Dies ließe sich mit verschiedenen Strategien erreichen. Ein entscheidendes Enzym namens RuBisCo (Abkürzung für Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphat-Carboxylase/Oxygenase) arbeitet relativ langsam und ineffizient. Deshalb versuchen weltweit mehrere Forscherteams, das Enzym effizienter zu machen. Auch die Kohlendioxid-Konzentration ist ein wichtiger Faktor in der Photosynthese. Weitere Optimierungsstrategien sind es daher, die Kohlendioxid-Konzentrationen in der unmittelbaren Umgebung der Pflanzen zu erhöhen und dafür zu sorgen, dass Pflanzen Kohlendioxid besser aufnehmen und nutzen können.

Bis vor kurzem beruhten Einschätzungen der Praktikabilität solcher Strategien jedoch hauptsächlich auf Vorstudien. Und so blieben die Ideen oft lediglich Ideen. Genau den Prozess anzukurbeln, auf dem das gesamte Pflanzenwachstum basiert, ist unbestreitbar ein attraktives Konzept – aber kann es tatsächlich funktionieren?

 

Seit Jahrzehnten versucht die Forschung die Mechanismen der Photosynthese aufzuklären. Forscher nutzen diese Erkenntnisse jetzt, um Ernteerträge zu steigern und so die Zukunft unserer Nahrungsmittelversorgung zu gewährleisten. Credit: alvarez/iStock.com

Seit Jahrzehnten versucht die Forschung die Mechanismen der Photosynthese aufzuklären. Forscher nutzen diese Erkenntnisse jetzt, um Ernteerträge zu steigern und so die Zukunft unserer Nahrungsmittelversorgung zu gewährleisten. Credit: alvarez/iStock.com

 

Im Herbst letzten Jahres zeigte eine neue Studie, dass eine effizientere Photosynthese tatsächlich zu spürbar höheren Ernteerträgen führt – zumindest bei der Tabakpflanze. Die Autoren, ein Team von Wissenschaftlern aus den USA, Großbritannien und Polen unter der Leitung von Krishna K. Niyogi und Stephen P. Long, verfolgten einen strikt systematischen Ansatz: Zunächst simulierten sie den chemischen Prozesses der Photosynthese in seiner Gesamtheit, um potentielle Schritte zu identifizieren, an denen sich die Reaktion durch Interventionen möglicherweise optimieren ließe. Den Forschern fiel dabei auf, dass Pflanzen wesentlich mehr Energie aus der Sonne aufnehmen, als sie nutzen können. Als Reaktion auf eine direkte starke Sonneneinstrahlung aktivieren Pflanzen einen Mechanismus, um sich selbst und ihre Photosynthese-Enzyme zu schützen: die nicht-photochemische Fluoreszenzlöschung. Wenn dieser Mechanismus dann aber wieder abgeschaltet werden soll, arbeiten sie nicht gerade effizient. So kann die Photosyntheseaktivität ganze 30 Minuten lang heruntergedrosselt sein. Die Autoren haben berechnet, dass die Gesamtausbeute unter schwankenden Lichtverhältnissen um bis zu 30 Prozent abnehmen könnte. Um dieser Frage weiter nachzugehen und eine schnellere Reaktivierung der Photosynthese bei Sonnenlichtexposition zu fördern, züchtete das Team von Niyogi und Long gentechnisch veränderte Tabakpflanzen. Diese Pflanzen produzierten drei Schlüsselproteine, die die Wiederaufnahme der Photosynthese unter schwankenden Lichtverhältnissen beschleunigen, in größeren Mengen. Mit dieser Strategie erzielten sie spektakuläre Ergebnisse: Die gentechnisch veränderten Pflanzen erbrachten Erträge, die durchschnittlich 15 Prozent über dem unveränderten Tabak lagen. Jetzt wenden die Forscher ihr Konzept auf Reis und andere bedeutende Nahrungspflanzen an.

Wissenschaftlern des Rothamsted Research in Großbritannien, dem weltweit ältesten Agrarforschungsinstitut, berichteten kürzlich von weiteren bahnbrechenden Entwicklungen. Sie verfolgen einen anderen Ansatz zur Effizienzsteigerung der Photosynthese: Sie züchten Pflanzen, die größere Mengen des Enzyms Sedoheptulose-1,7-Bisphosphatase (SBPase) herstellen. Es gelang ihnen wohl bereits, so den Ertrag von Weizen unter Gewächshausbedingungen erhebliche zu steigern. Jetzt testen die Forscher, ob dies auch beim Weizenanbau auf dem Acker möglich ist.

Jahrzehntelange Forschungsbemühungen wurden in die Aufklärung der Photosyntheseakteure und -mechanismen investiert – und mit einigen Nobelpreisen gekrönt. Mit gutem Grund: Wenn wir besser verstehen, wie die Photosynthese funktioniert, könnten wir so womöglich unsere Nahrungsmittelversorgung sichern. Die aktuellen Erfolge, mit Hilfe dieses Grundlagenwissens deutlich höhere Ernteerträge zu erzielen, lassen darauf hoffen, dass wir schon bald die Früchte dieser Strategie ernten können. Es bleibt spannend.

Revealing the Secrets of Membrane Proteins

2.3 billion years ago, “the probably most significant extinction event in history” took place. This is how Hartmut Michel starts his 2015 lecture in Lindau, describing the Great Oxygenation Event, or GOE. What happened so early in the history of life? Ancestors of today’s cyanobacteria developed photosynthesis, a process that uses energy from sunlight, water and carbon dioxide to produce carbohydrates. Today, photosynthesis is considered “the most important chemical reaction on earth”, providing food for humans and animals, releasing oxygen for them to breathe – and millions of years later, this process provides fossil fuel in the form of oil, coal and natural gas, as Michel likes to point out.

But for the earliest single-cell organisms billions of years ago, free oxygen was a toxin. If they couldn’t somehow deal with large amounts of it in the atmosphere, as well as with the subsequent molecules from the ‘reactive oxygen species’ ROS, they died. One very effective way to ‘deal’ with free oxygen is the production of ‘oxygen reductases’: proteins that reduce oxygen to water, and simultaneously conserve the energy inherent in this chemical reaction. For more than the last ten years, Hartmut Michel has studied different oxygen reductases at the Max Planck Institute of Biophysics in Frankfurt, where he became director in 1987. One year later, Hartmut Michel was awarded the 1988 Nobel Prize in Chemistry “for the determination of the three-dimensional structure of a photosynthetic reaction centre”, together with Johann Deisenhofer and Robert Huber. More about photosynthesis in a minute.

 

The electron transport chain in the mitonchondrial intermembrane space. Cytochrome c is part of Complex IV. Graph: T-Fork, based on graph by LadyofHats, both public domain

The electron transport chain in the mitonchondrial intermembrane space. Cytochrome c oxidase is part of Complex IV. Graph: T-Fork, based on graph by LadyofHats, both public domain

 

In recent years, Michel and his research group mainly studied two types of oxygen reductases: the so-called superfamily of ‘heme-copper oxidases’, and the ‘cytochrome bd oxidase’. All of these oxidases are located in membranes and are thus called ‘membrane integrated terminal oxidases’. A famous example from the superfamily is cytochrome c oxidase, the last enzyme in the respiratory electron transport chain located in the mitochondrial membrane (see graph). It receives one electron from each of four cytochrome c molecules, transfers them to an oxygen molecule, converting molecular oxygen to two molecules of water. It also helps to pump the protons, which the ATP synthase needs to make ATP, across the membrane: “the general energy currency of life”, as Michel explained in his 2015 Lindau lecture. Did you know that your body produces an astounding amount of 70 kg of ATP every day to provide ‘fuel’ for its many processes? These include breathing, digesting and maintaining body heat, etc.

 

Hartmut Michel during his 2014 lecture at the 64th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting. Photo: Christian Flemming/LNLM

Hartmut Michel during his 2014 lecture at the 64th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting. Photo: Christian Flemming/LNLM

Interestingly, many oxygen reductases seem to have developed before the GOE. If this holds true – what were their functions? This is a ‘paradox’ that researchers haven’t solved yet. Another astounding result of Michel’s research is the fact that the two forms of oxygen reductases that he studies have many similarities, despite their structural differences: for instance, they both transport four electrons simultaneously, thus preventing the formation of ROS. “So obviously, the same mechanism was invented twice by Mother Nature,” Michel concludes in his lecture.

The photosynthetic reaction center is a membrane protein as well – the very first membrane protein whose structure could be elucidated. When Michel studied biochemistry in Tübingen and Würzburg, textbooks stated as an irrevocable fact that membrane proteins could not be crystallized. Since x-ray crystallography was, and still is, the best way to reveal the molecular structure of proteins, neither their structure nor their function could be determined without crystallization. Incidentally, many Nobel prizes were awarded in the last 100 years for developing x-ray crystallography.

But Hartmut Michel didn’t accept this scientific consensus. One major obstacle in crystallizing membrane proteins was that they are actually membrane proteins and lipids together, meaning the membrane is partly hydrophobic and it is thus impossible to create an aqueous solution. To solve this problem, detergents were needed, but they tend to form large micelles that can obscure the protein within. Finally, Michel found a fitting detergent, Heptan-1,2,3-triol, that forms smaller molecule clusters. Now, he had to decide on a membrane protein: He finally chose to work with the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis, the name meaning “a red pseudo cell that is green”. These bacteria are capable of photosynthesis, like many plants, and their reaction centre could be isolated.

 

Determining protein structures with the help of x-ray crystallization is a very elaborate process: first, the protein needs to be crystallized, and this is very difficult with membrane proteins. Next, x-rays reveal a refraction pattern that's transformed into an electron density map with the help of advanced calculus. Finally, the protein structure is derived from this. Graph: Thomas Splettstoesser, www.scistyle.com, CC BY-SA 3.0

Determining protein structures with the help of x-ray crystallography is a very elaborate process: first, the protein needs to be crystallized, and this is very difficult with membrane proteins. Next, x-rays reveal a diffraction pattern that’s transformed into an electron density map with the help of advanced calculus. Finally, the protein structure is derived from this, again with advanced mathematics. Graph: Thomas Splettstoesser, www.scistyle.com, CC BY-SA 3.0

Johann Deisenhofer and Robert Huber provided the mathematics required for the elucidation of their atomic structure. The researchers first published their results in 1985, and received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for this finding only three years later. In the early 1980s, it took Michel about four months to create an entire data set (see graph on right). Nowadays, one set can be created within seconds. Since their first publication, the atomic structures of more than 600 membrane proteins have been identified. Only about 50 of these are human membrane proteins – but there are several thousands in total! So there’s still a lot to be done.

Why is it so important to understand more about human membrane proteins? 80 percent of all current drugs affect membrane proteins, and more than 50 percent of all drugs target them directly. These proteins play a crucial role in infections, both viral and bacterial, as well as in many forms of cancer. That’s why Hartmut Michel concluded his 2016 Lindau lecture: “Most diseases are caused by a malfunction, understimulation or overstimulation of a certain membrane protein.” Consequently, understanding human membrane proteins could dramatically help cure disease.

Hartmut Michel is a committed supporter of the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings: he visited them twenty times, seven videos of his lectures are available here, and he’s also a member of the meetings’ Council. We’re looking forward to welcoming him in June 2017 at the 67th Meeting dedicated to chemistry.

 

 

 

 

Membranproteinen ihre Geheimnisse entlocken

Vor ungefähr 2,3 Milliarden Jahren kam es „zum wohl größten Massensterben der Erdgeschichte“, so Hartmut Michel zu Beginn seines Vortrags auf der Lindauer Nobelpreisträgertagung 2015. Er beschreibt die sogenannte Große Sauerstoffkatastrophe (englisch GOE, für Great Oxygenation Event), die sich ereignete, als erstmals große Mengen an freiem Sauerstoff in die Atmosphäre gelangten – für die Mehrzahl der damals existierenden Organismen ein tödliches Gift. Doch wie kam es dazu? Die Vorfahren der heutigen Cyanobakterien entwickelten die Photosynthese: Mit Hilfe von Licht, Wasser und Kohlendioxid stellten sie Sauerstoff und Kohlenhydrate in bislang nie dagewesenen Mengen her.

Hartmut Michel erhielt den Chemienobelpreis 1988 „für die Ermittlung der dreidimensionalen Struktur eines Photosynthesezentrums“, zusammen mit Johann Deisenhofer und Robert Huber. Das Nobelpreiskomitee nannte die Photosynthese „die wichigste chemische Reaktion auf Erden“, weil sie Atemluft und Nahrung für Mensch und Tier bereitstellt. Zudem ist sie für die Entstehung der meisten fossilen Energiequellen wie Kohle, Öl und Gas verantwortlich, allerdings mit ein paar Millionen Jahren Verzögerung.

Vor Milliarden Jahren standen die Kleinstlebewesen vor der Herausforderung, mit den großen Sauerstoffmengen zurechtzukommen. Außerdem mussten sie mit den Molekülen der sogenannten reaktive Sauerstoffspezies umgehen können (englisch ROS, für reactive oxygen species). Ein sehr effizienter Weg, freien Sauerstoff unschädlich zu machen, sind Sauerstoff-Reduktasen, also spezielle Enzyme, die Sauerstoff zu Wasser reduzieren. Sie werden auch Oxidoreduktasen genannt. Gleichzeitig helfen sie, die Energie zu speichern, die bei solchen Reaktionen freigesetzt wird. Seit über zehn Jahren analysiert Hartmut Michel nun solche Reduktasen am Max-Planck-Institut für Biophysik in Frankfurt am Main, wo er seit 1987 Direktor ist.

 

Schematische Darstellung des Elektronentransport der inneren Mitochondrienmembran. Die Cytochrom-c-Oxidase ist Teil des Komplex IV. Grafik: T-Fork, auf der basis der Grafik von LadyofHats, beide public domain

Schematische Darstellung des Elektronentransports in der inneren Mitochondrienmembran. Die Cytochrom-c-Oxidase ist Teil von Komplex IV. Grafik: T-Fork, auf der basis der Grafik von LadyofHats, beide public domain

 

In den vergangenen Jahren analysierte Hartmut Michel zusammen mit seiner Forschungsgruppe vor allem zwei Sorten von Oxidoreduktasen: Die Superfamilie der Häm-Kupfer-Oxidasen und die Cytochrom-bd-Oxidase. All diese Oxidasen befinden sich in Membranen. Ein bekanntes Beispiel der Superfamilie ist die Cytochrom-c-Oxidase, das letzte Enzym im Elektronentransport der inneren Mitochondrienmembran (siehe Grafik oben). Diese Oxidase erhält jeweils ein Elektron von vier Cytochrom-c-Molekülen und transportiert diese zu Sauerstoffmolekülen. Aus diesen Zutaten werden zwei Wassermoleküle gebildet. Sie ist außerdem behilflich, zwei Protonen, die für die Bildung von ATP nötig sind, durch die Membran hindurch zu pumpen. „ATP ist die allgemeine Energiewährung des Lebens“, erklärt Michel in seinem Lindau-Vortrag von 2015. Wussten Sie, dass Ihr Körper täglich bis zu 75 kg ATP produziert, damit wir zum Atmen, Verdauen und Bewegen ausreichend Energie zur Verfügung haben? Außerdem müssen wir unsere Körpertemperatur halten, und es gibt viele weitere Prozesse im Körper, die viel Energie benötigen.

 

Hartmut Michel während seines Vortrags in Lindau beim 64. Nobelpreisträgertreffen 2014. Foto: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting

Hartmut Michel während seines Vortrags in Lindau bei der 64. Nobelpreisträgertagung 2014. Foto: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Interessanterweise waren Oxidoreduktasen wohl bereits vorhanden, bevor sich freier Sauerstoff massenhaft in der Atmosphäre anreicherte. Aber welche Funktion hatten sie damals? Dieses ‘Paradox’ hat die Forschung bislang nicht aufklären können. Ein weiteres interessantes Ergebnis von Michel ist, dass sich die beiden Oxidase-Gruppen zwar strukturell deutlich unterscheiden, aber doch etliche Gemeinsamkeiten aufweisen: Beispielsweise transportieren beide Systeme häufig vier Elektronen gleichzeitig – so wird die Bildung von ROS effektiv verhindert. „Es scheint, als habe Mutter Natur dieselbe Erfindung gleich zweimal gemacht“, folgert Michel in seinem Vortrag.

Das photosynthetische Reaktionszentrum, für dessen Beschreibung Michel, Deisenhofer und Huber den Nobelpreis erhielten, ist ebenfalls ein Membranprotein – das allererste, dessen Struktur bestimmt werden konnte. Als Hartmut Michel noch Student in Tübingen und Würzburg war, galt die Lehrmeinung, dass Membranproteine grundsätzlich nicht kristallisiert werden können. Damals wie heute ist die Röntgenstrukturanalyse die beste Methode, um die molekulare Struktur, und damit die Funktion von Proteinen, zu ermitteln. Ohne Kristallisation kann sie jedoch nicht angewendet werden. Für die Entwicklung und Verbesserung der Röntgenstrukturanalyse wurden in den letzten hundert Jahren übrigens etliche Nobelpreise verliehen.

Doch Hartmut Michel wollte sich nicht mit der herrschenden Lehrmeinung abfinden. Also machte er sich daran, das erste Membranprotein zu kristallisieren. Ein großes Problem hierbei war die Tatsache, dass es sich bei diesen Proteinen eigentlich um eine Mischung aus Lipiden und Proteinen handelt, was dazu führt, dass sie teilweise hydrophob sind, also wasserabweisend, und sie deshalb nicht in wässrigen Flüssigkeiten gelöst werden können. Also braucht man Lösungsmittel, und Michel machte sich auf die Suche nach passenden sogenannten Detergenzien. Viele von ihnen bilden jedoch Mizellen. Das sind Zusammenballungen von Seifenmolekülen, die ihre hydrophilen Enden nach außen und die hydrophoben nach innen ausrichten. Der Nachteil hierbei ist, dass die gelösten Proteine in den dichten Mizellen ‘versteckt’ werden können.

 

Die Struktur eines Proteins mit Hilfe der Röntgenstrukturanalyse zu ermitteln ist ein aufwändiges Verfahren: Zunächst einmal muss das Protein kristallisiert werden, das ist bei Membranproteinen besonders schwierig. Dann wird mit Röntgenstrahlen ein Beugungsbild erstellt (diffraction pattern). Mit fortgeschrittener Analysis wird aus diesem Bild eine Elektronendichtekarte ermittelt, schließlich kann auch eine Struktur des Moleküls errechnet werden. Grafik: Thomas Splettstoesser, www.scistyle.com, CC BY-SA 3.0

Die Röntgenstrukturanalyse ist ein aufwändiges Verfahren: Zunächst einmal muss das Protein kristallisiert werden. Das ist bei Membranproteinen besonders schwierig. Dann wird mit Röntgenstrahlen ein Beugungsbild erstellt (diffraction pattern). Mit fortgeschrittener Analysis wird aus diesem Bild eine Elektronendichtekarte ermittelt. Schließlich kann auch die Struktur des Moleküls errechnet werden. Grafik: Thomas Splettstoesser, www.scistyle.com, CC BY-SA 3.0

Endlich fand Michel ein passendes Lösungsmittel, Heptan-1,2,3-triol, das kleinere Molekül-Verklumpungen bildet, sodass die Proteine herausgelöst, kristallisiert und analysiert werden können. Als nächstes musste er sich für ein bestimmtes Membranprotein entscheiden. Nach mehreren Fehlversuchen entschied er sich für das Purpurbakterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis, wörtlich „eine rote, falsche Zelle, die grün ist“. Diese Bakterien sind Photosynthese-fähig, genau wie Pflanzen, und ihr Reaktionszentrum hierfür kann isoliert werden. Auf diese Weise gelang Michel 1981 die Kristallisation des ersten Membranproteins.

Doch mit der Kristallisation war es nicht getan: Die Röntgenstrukturanalyse erfordert eine anspruchsvolle höhere Mathematik, um aus dem Beugungsbild der Röntgenstrahlen an den Elektronen des Kristalls eine dreidimensionale Struktur zu errechnen (siehe Schaubild rechts). Der Beitrag von Deisenhofer und Huber an diesem Projekt waren diese mathematischen Methoden. Die drei Forscher publizierten ihre Ergebnisse 1985. Nur drei Jahre später erhielten sie dafür den Chemienobelpreis. In den frühen 1980er Jahren brauchte Hartmut Michel noch ungefähr vier Monate, um einen kompletten Datensatz mit vielen Röntgenbildern zu erstellen. Heute entsteht ein solcher Datensatz automatisch innerhalb von Sekunden.

Seit dieser ersten Entdeckung entschlüsselten Forscher die Strukturen von über 600 Membranproteinen. Ungefähr fünfzig davon sind menschliche Membranproteine – doch es gibt insgesamt mehrere tausend! Hier ist also noch eine Menge zu tun.
Warum ist es überhaupt so wichtig, die Struktur und Funktion von diesen Proteinen zu kennen? 80 Prozent aller Arzneimittel wirken auf Membranproteine, und über 50 Prozent von ihnen haben diese Proteine als Zielstruktur. Das hat einen Grund: Sie spielen bei vielen Infektionen eine Schlüsselrolle, sowohl bei Viren als auch bei Bakterien, und sie sind an vielen Krebserkrankungen beteiligt. Diese Tatsache fasst Michel in seinem 2016er Lindau-Vortrag folgendermaßen zusammen: „Die meisten Krankheiten entstehen entweder durch eine Fehlfunktion, oder durch eine Über- oder Unterstimulierung eines bestimmten Membranproteins.“

Hartmut Michel ist ein langjähriger Unterstützer der Lindauer Nobelpreisträgertagungen. Er nahm bisher an zwanzig Tagungen teil, Videos seiner Vorträge finden Sie hier. Und er ist Mitglied im Kuratorium der Lindauer Nobelpreisträgertagungen. Wir freuen uns sehr, ihn im Juni 2017 bei der 67. Tagung, die dem Fach Chemie gewidmet ist, begrüßen zu dürfen.