Revealing the Secrets of Membrane Proteins

2.3 billion years ago, “the probably most significant extinction event in history” took place. This is how Hartmut Michel starts his 2015 lecture in Lindau, describing the Great Oxygenation Event, or GOE. What happened so early in the history of life? Ancestors of today’s cyanobacteria developed photosynthesis, a process that uses energy from sunlight, water and carbon dioxide to produce carbohydrates. Today, photosynthesis is considered “the most important chemical reaction on earth”, providing food for humans and animals, releasing oxygen for them to breathe – and millions of years later, this process provides fossil fuel in the form of oil, coal and natural gas, as Michel likes to point out.

But for the earliest single-cell organisms billions of years ago, free oxygen was a toxin. If they couldn’t somehow deal with large amounts of it in the atmosphere, as well as with the subsequent molecules from the ‘reactive oxygen species’ ROS, they died. One very effective way to ‘deal’ with free oxygen is the production of ‘oxygen reductases’: proteins that reduce oxygen to water, and simultaneously conserve the energy inherent in this chemical reaction. For more than the last ten years, Hartmut Michel has studied different oxygen reductases at the Max Planck Institute of Biophysics in Frankfurt, where he became director in 1987. One year later, Hartmut Michel was awarded the 1988 Nobel Prize in Chemistry “for the determination of the three-dimensional structure of a photosynthetic reaction centre”, together with Johann Deisenhofer and Robert Huber. More about photosynthesis in a minute.

 

The electron transport chain in the mitonchondrial intermembrane space. Cytochrome c is part of Complex IV. Graph: T-Fork, based on graph by LadyofHats, both public domain

The electron transport chain in the mitonchondrial intermembrane space. Cytochrome c oxidase is part of Complex IV. Graph: T-Fork, based on graph by LadyofHats, both public domain

 

In recent years, Michel and his research group mainly studied two types of oxygen reductases: the so-called superfamily of ‘heme-copper oxidases’, and the ‘cytochrome bd oxidase’. All of these oxidases are located in membranes and are thus called ‘membrane integrated terminal oxidases’. A famous example from the superfamily is cytochrome c oxidase, the last enzyme in the respiratory electron transport chain located in the mitochondrial membrane (see graph). It receives one electron from each of four cytochrome c molecules, transfers them to an oxygen molecule, converting molecular oxygen to two molecules of water. It also helps to pump the protons, which the ATP synthase needs to make ATP, across the membrane: “the general energy currency of life”, as Michel explained in his 2015 Lindau lecture. Did you know that your body produces an astounding amount of 70 kg of ATP every day to provide ‘fuel’ for its many processes? These include breathing, digesting and maintaining body heat, etc.

 

Hartmut Michel during his 2014 lecture at the 64th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting. Photo: Christian Flemming/LNLM

Hartmut Michel during his 2014 lecture at the 64th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting. Photo: Christian Flemming/LNLM

Interestingly, many oxygen reductases seem to have developed before the GOE. If this holds true – what were their functions? This is a ‘paradox’ that researchers haven’t solved yet. Another astounding result of Michel’s research is the fact that the two forms of oxygen reductases that he studies have many similarities, despite their structural differences: for instance, they both transport four electrons simultaneously, thus preventing the formation of ROS. “So obviously, the same mechanism was invented twice by Mother Nature,” Michel concludes in his lecture.

The photosynthetic reaction center is a membrane protein as well – the very first membrane protein whose structure could be elucidated. When Michel studied biochemistry in Tübingen and Würzburg, textbooks stated as an irrevocable fact that membrane proteins could not be crystallized. Since x-ray crystallography was, and still is, the best way to reveal the molecular structure of proteins, neither their structure nor their function could be determined without crystallization. Incidentally, many Nobel prizes were awarded in the last 100 years for developing x-ray crystallography.

But Hartmut Michel didn’t accept this scientific consensus. One major obstacle in crystallizing membrane proteins was that they are actually membrane proteins and lipids together, meaning the membrane is partly hydrophobic and it is thus impossible to create an aqueous solution. To solve this problem, detergents were needed, but they tend to form large micelles that can obscure the protein within. Finally, Michel found a fitting detergent, Heptan-1,2,3-triol, that forms smaller molecule clusters. Now, he had to decide on a membrane protein: He finally chose to work with the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis, the name meaning “a red pseudo cell that is green”. These bacteria are capable of photosynthesis, like many plants, and their reaction centre could be isolated.

 

Determining protein structures with the help of x-ray crystallization is a very elaborate process: first, the protein needs to be crystallized, and this is very difficult with membrane proteins. Next, x-rays reveal a refraction pattern that's transformed into an electron density map with the help of advanced calculus. Finally, the protein structure is derived from this. Graph: Thomas Splettstoesser, www.scistyle.com, CC BY-SA 3.0

Determining protein structures with the help of x-ray crystallography is a very elaborate process: first, the protein needs to be crystallized, and this is very difficult with membrane proteins. Next, x-rays reveal a diffraction pattern that’s transformed into an electron density map with the help of advanced calculus. Finally, the protein structure is derived from this, again with advanced mathematics. Graph: Thomas Splettstoesser, www.scistyle.com, CC BY-SA 3.0

Johann Deisenhofer and Robert Huber provided the mathematics required for the elucidation of their atomic structure. The researchers first published their results in 1985, and received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for this finding only three years later. In the early 1980s, it took Michel about four months to create an entire data set (see graph on right). Nowadays, one set can be created within seconds. Since their first publication, the atomic structures of more than 600 membrane proteins have been identified. Only about 50 of these are human membrane proteins – but there are several thousands in total! So there’s still a lot to be done.

Why is it so important to understand more about human membrane proteins? 80 percent of all current drugs affect membrane proteins, and more than 50 percent of all drugs target them directly. These proteins play a crucial role in infections, both viral and bacterial, as well as in many forms of cancer. That’s why Hartmut Michel concluded his 2016 Lindau lecture: “Most diseases are caused by a malfunction, understimulation or overstimulation of a certain membrane protein.” Consequently, understanding human membrane proteins could dramatically help cure disease.

Hartmut Michel is a committed supporter of the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings: he visited them twenty times, seven videos of his lectures are available here, and he’s also a member of the meetings’ Council. We’re looking forward to welcoming him in June 2017 at the 67th Meeting dedicated to chemistry.

 

 

 

 

Membranproteinen ihre Geheimnisse entlocken

Vor ungefähr 2,3 Milliarden Jahren kam es „zum wohl größten Massensterben der Erdgeschichte“, so Hartmut Michel zu Beginn seines Vortrags auf der Lindauer Nobelpreisträgertagung 2015. Er beschreibt die sogenannte Große Sauerstoffkatastrophe (englisch GOE, für Great Oxygenation Event), die sich ereignete, als erstmals große Mengen an freiem Sauerstoff in die Atmosphäre gelangten – für die Mehrzahl der damals existierenden Organismen ein tödliches Gift. Doch wie kam es dazu? Die Vorfahren der heutigen Cyanobakterien entwickelten die Photosynthese: Mit Hilfe von Licht, Wasser und Kohlendioxid stellten sie Sauerstoff und Kohlenhydrate in bislang nie dagewesenen Mengen her.

Hartmut Michel erhielt den Chemienobelpreis 1988 „für die Ermittlung der dreidimensionalen Struktur eines Photosynthesezentrums“, zusammen mit Johann Deisenhofer und Robert Huber. Das Nobelpreiskomitee nannte die Photosynthese „die wichigste chemische Reaktion auf Erden“, weil sie Atemluft und Nahrung für Mensch und Tier bereitstellt. Zudem ist sie für die Entstehung der meisten fossilen Energiequellen wie Kohle, Öl und Gas verantwortlich, allerdings mit ein paar Millionen Jahren Verzögerung.

Vor Milliarden Jahren standen die Kleinstlebewesen vor der Herausforderung, mit den großen Sauerstoffmengen zurechtzukommen. Außerdem mussten sie mit den Molekülen der sogenannten reaktive Sauerstoffspezies umgehen können (englisch ROS, für reactive oxygen species). Ein sehr effizienter Weg, freien Sauerstoff unschädlich zu machen, sind Sauerstoff-Reduktasen, also spezielle Enzyme, die Sauerstoff zu Wasser reduzieren. Sie werden auch Oxidoreduktasen genannt. Gleichzeitig helfen sie, die Energie zu speichern, die bei solchen Reaktionen freigesetzt wird. Seit über zehn Jahren analysiert Hartmut Michel nun solche Reduktasen am Max-Planck-Institut für Biophysik in Frankfurt am Main, wo er seit 1987 Direktor ist.

 

Schematische Darstellung des Elektronentransport der inneren Mitochondrienmembran. Die Cytochrom-c-Oxidase ist Teil des Komplex IV. Grafik: T-Fork, auf der basis der Grafik von LadyofHats, beide public domain

Schematische Darstellung des Elektronentransports in der inneren Mitochondrienmembran. Die Cytochrom-c-Oxidase ist Teil von Komplex IV. Grafik: T-Fork, auf der basis der Grafik von LadyofHats, beide public domain

 

In den vergangenen Jahren analysierte Hartmut Michel zusammen mit seiner Forschungsgruppe vor allem zwei Sorten von Oxidoreduktasen: Die Superfamilie der Häm-Kupfer-Oxidasen und die Cytochrom-bd-Oxidase. All diese Oxidasen befinden sich in Membranen. Ein bekanntes Beispiel der Superfamilie ist die Cytochrom-c-Oxidase, das letzte Enzym im Elektronentransport der inneren Mitochondrienmembran (siehe Grafik oben). Diese Oxidase erhält jeweils ein Elektron von vier Cytochrom-c-Molekülen und transportiert diese zu Sauerstoffmolekülen. Aus diesen Zutaten werden zwei Wassermoleküle gebildet. Sie ist außerdem behilflich, zwei Protonen, die für die Bildung von ATP nötig sind, durch die Membran hindurch zu pumpen. „ATP ist die allgemeine Energiewährung des Lebens“, erklärt Michel in seinem Lindau-Vortrag von 2015. Wussten Sie, dass Ihr Körper täglich bis zu 75 kg ATP produziert, damit wir zum Atmen, Verdauen und Bewegen ausreichend Energie zur Verfügung haben? Außerdem müssen wir unsere Körpertemperatur halten, und es gibt viele weitere Prozesse im Körper, die viel Energie benötigen.

 

Hartmut Michel während seines Vortrags in Lindau beim 64. Nobelpreisträgertreffen 2014. Foto: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting

Hartmut Michel während seines Vortrags in Lindau bei der 64. Nobelpreisträgertagung 2014. Foto: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Interessanterweise waren Oxidoreduktasen wohl bereits vorhanden, bevor sich freier Sauerstoff massenhaft in der Atmosphäre anreicherte. Aber welche Funktion hatten sie damals? Dieses ‘Paradox’ hat die Forschung bislang nicht aufklären können. Ein weiteres interessantes Ergebnis von Michel ist, dass sich die beiden Oxidase-Gruppen zwar strukturell deutlich unterscheiden, aber doch etliche Gemeinsamkeiten aufweisen: Beispielsweise transportieren beide Systeme häufig vier Elektronen gleichzeitig – so wird die Bildung von ROS effektiv verhindert. „Es scheint, als habe Mutter Natur dieselbe Erfindung gleich zweimal gemacht“, folgert Michel in seinem Vortrag.

Das photosynthetische Reaktionszentrum, für dessen Beschreibung Michel, Deisenhofer und Huber den Nobelpreis erhielten, ist ebenfalls ein Membranprotein – das allererste, dessen Struktur bestimmt werden konnte. Als Hartmut Michel noch Student in Tübingen und Würzburg war, galt die Lehrmeinung, dass Membranproteine grundsätzlich nicht kristallisiert werden können. Damals wie heute ist die Röntgenstrukturanalyse die beste Methode, um die molekulare Struktur, und damit die Funktion von Proteinen, zu ermitteln. Ohne Kristallisation kann sie jedoch nicht angewendet werden. Für die Entwicklung und Verbesserung der Röntgenstrukturanalyse wurden in den letzten hundert Jahren übrigens etliche Nobelpreise verliehen.

Doch Hartmut Michel wollte sich nicht mit der herrschenden Lehrmeinung abfinden. Also machte er sich daran, das erste Membranprotein zu kristallisieren. Ein großes Problem hierbei war die Tatsache, dass es sich bei diesen Proteinen eigentlich um eine Mischung aus Lipiden und Proteinen handelt, was dazu führt, dass sie teilweise hydrophob sind, also wasserabweisend, und sie deshalb nicht in wässrigen Flüssigkeiten gelöst werden können. Also braucht man Lösungsmittel, und Michel machte sich auf die Suche nach passenden sogenannten Detergenzien. Viele von ihnen bilden jedoch Mizellen. Das sind Zusammenballungen von Seifenmolekülen, die ihre hydrophilen Enden nach außen und die hydrophoben nach innen ausrichten. Der Nachteil hierbei ist, dass die gelösten Proteine in den dichten Mizellen ‘versteckt’ werden können.

 

Die Struktur eines Proteins mit Hilfe der Röntgenstrukturanalyse zu ermitteln ist ein aufwändiges Verfahren: Zunächst einmal muss das Protein kristallisiert werden, das ist bei Membranproteinen besonders schwierig. Dann wird mit Röntgenstrahlen ein Beugungsbild erstellt (diffraction pattern). Mit fortgeschrittener Analysis wird aus diesem Bild eine Elektronendichtekarte ermittelt, schließlich kann auch eine Struktur des Moleküls errechnet werden. Grafik: Thomas Splettstoesser, www.scistyle.com, CC BY-SA 3.0

Die Röntgenstrukturanalyse ist ein aufwändiges Verfahren: Zunächst einmal muss das Protein kristallisiert werden. Das ist bei Membranproteinen besonders schwierig. Dann wird mit Röntgenstrahlen ein Beugungsbild erstellt (diffraction pattern). Mit fortgeschrittener Analysis wird aus diesem Bild eine Elektronendichtekarte ermittelt. Schließlich kann auch die Struktur des Moleküls errechnet werden. Grafik: Thomas Splettstoesser, www.scistyle.com, CC BY-SA 3.0

Endlich fand Michel ein passendes Lösungsmittel, Heptan-1,2,3-triol, das kleinere Molekül-Verklumpungen bildet, sodass die Proteine herausgelöst, kristallisiert und analysiert werden können. Als nächstes musste er sich für ein bestimmtes Membranprotein entscheiden. Nach mehreren Fehlversuchen entschied er sich für das Purpurbakterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis, wörtlich „eine rote, falsche Zelle, die grün ist“. Diese Bakterien sind Photosynthese-fähig, genau wie Pflanzen, und ihr Reaktionszentrum hierfür kann isoliert werden. Auf diese Weise gelang Michel 1981 die Kristallisation des ersten Membranproteins.

Doch mit der Kristallisation war es nicht getan: Die Röntgenstrukturanalyse erfordert eine anspruchsvolle höhere Mathematik, um aus dem Beugungsbild der Röntgenstrahlen an den Elektronen des Kristalls eine dreidimensionale Struktur zu errechnen (siehe Schaubild rechts). Der Beitrag von Deisenhofer und Huber an diesem Projekt waren diese mathematischen Methoden. Die drei Forscher publizierten ihre Ergebnisse 1985. Nur drei Jahre später erhielten sie dafür den Chemienobelpreis. In den frühen 1980er Jahren brauchte Hartmut Michel noch ungefähr vier Monate, um einen kompletten Datensatz mit vielen Röntgenbildern zu erstellen. Heute entsteht ein solcher Datensatz automatisch innerhalb von Sekunden.

Seit dieser ersten Entdeckung entschlüsselten Forscher die Strukturen von über 600 Membranproteinen. Ungefähr fünfzig davon sind menschliche Membranproteine – doch es gibt insgesamt mehrere tausend! Hier ist also noch eine Menge zu tun.
Warum ist es überhaupt so wichtig, die Struktur und Funktion von diesen Proteinen zu kennen? 80 Prozent aller Arzneimittel wirken auf Membranproteine, und über 50 Prozent von ihnen haben diese Proteine als Zielstruktur. Das hat einen Grund: Sie spielen bei vielen Infektionen eine Schlüsselrolle, sowohl bei Viren als auch bei Bakterien, und sie sind an vielen Krebserkrankungen beteiligt. Diese Tatsache fasst Michel in seinem 2016er Lindau-Vortrag folgendermaßen zusammen: „Die meisten Krankheiten entstehen entweder durch eine Fehlfunktion, oder durch eine Über- oder Unterstimulierung eines bestimmten Membranproteins.“

Hartmut Michel ist ein langjähriger Unterstützer der Lindauer Nobelpreisträgertagungen. Er nahm bisher an zwanzig Tagungen teil, Videos seiner Vorträge finden Sie hier. Und er ist Mitglied im Kuratorium der Lindauer Nobelpreisträgertagungen. Wir freuen uns sehr, ihn im Juni 2017 bei der 67. Tagung, die dem Fach Chemie gewidmet ist, begrüßen zu dürfen.

 

 

 

Fuelling controversy (Biofuels – Chu & Michel)

We are facing a global energy crisis, and scientists are charged with finding alternatives to fossil fuels. In this film, Nobel laureates Steven Chu and Hartmut Michel visit a farm with three young researchers to consider our energy future. They ask whether biofuels can power the planet and, if not, what are the alternatives? The researchers are full of optimism but Chu former US Secretary of Energy brings them back down to earth with the harsh reality of economics, while Michel envisions a future powered by clean electricity.